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Rifle slings - I have a mountain light sling it is just webbing and light weight swivels. It has on the fly adjustment. I can't seem to find the brand on the internet for some reason. It is old and starting to wear out though. What are others using??

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:32
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Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

They look like very well made packs? The loss of three pounds is very attractive for sure.
I really like not having to take my pack off to to put my rifle in and out of my scabbard though.
How is the the Kuiu for securing the animals head/cape to the pack --- easy??
Can you get to the hydration without taking everthing out of the pack?
They are extremely well made packs, but they aren't cheap. I agree about the gunscabbard, it is the best feature of the Eberle. The Kuiu is an awesome pack-out pack. It has tons of webbing straps, and they are all the same clip, so you can do some creative lashing for heads and capes. The meat cell is really ingenius. It supports and separates the meat from the rest of your cargo. The meat sits right next to the carbon fiber frame, and you can compress it down to the frame so it doesn't all ball up at the bottom of your pack, like the Eberle. The hipbelt pivots with you, and that has to be experienced to be appreciated. Access to hydration, or anything interior, is awesome becasue you can access the cargo from any side. It is certainly more complex of a pack than the Eberle.
Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

Rifle slings - I have a mountain light sling it is just webbing and light weight swivels. It has on the fly adjustment. I can't seem to find the brand on the internet for some reason. It is old and starting to wear out though. What are others using??
 
I use the stretchy Blacks Creek sling.  It does the job, and doesn't weigh much.  I actually didn't use a sling much with my Eberle, the scabbard was so convenient.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 01:23
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Rifle - Light weight is my first consideration when purchasing a rifle but not the only. The last one I bought was a Tikka t-3 light stainless with composite stock. This happened to be a excellent fit to the type of hunting I do. A high mileage DIY spot and stalk fair chase on public land mostly. Beretta guarantees 1 inch groups at 100yds mine shots much better than that with custom ammo I have read most other are much the same.
I like the looks of wood better than composite but, is not in any way affected by temperature, humidity and weather like wood. Plus it costs less and no worrys about scratches and dings and it can be lighter but, not always.
Stainless steel is real nice if your in out the weather obviously but, it does foul less to. Some say it is slightly more accurate and some say chromoly and stainless are the about the same. My barrel is fluted which is nice saves a some more weight.
Another way I went with the last rifle I bought a short action cartridge(.308) for several reasons.
 - Light short action/ammo
 - can get ammo anywhere/cheap if need be
 - .308/.30 caliber proven cartridge with a lot of bullet weight/powders opitions
 - not a barrel burner/high pressure cartridge
 - accurate
 - above average ballistics
 - super cheap if reloading - cheap brass - small amount of powder - .308 caliber
My Tikka alone weight just a tad over 6 pounds.
 
The next rifle I will most likely purchase will be a Savage 11/111 Lightweight Hunter
 
Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile
 


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:32
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 09:46
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I was going to suggest checking out the Browning Mountain TI rifles as well.  But Browning is not listing them on their site any more, they must have discontinued them.  The .308 I believe weighted in a 5lbs 7 oz.  I have the 300 WSM and it is 5lbs12oz I believe.  I have gotten 1/2 inch groups at 100 with little time spend on load, only 1 powder and 1 bullet.   They listed at around $1600 I believe, but I got mine for $800 new on gunbroker.  Makes me sad as I wanted one in 7mm-08 as well. 

They also have a short bolt lift, so you can use scopes with large eye pieces and mount them really low without any clearance issues.  They were stainless with synthetic stocks. 

Pretty easy packing for high, medium, or low mileage.  Crawling, walking, running, sprinting, stalking, fair or unfair chasing, doing it by myself or with my hunting buddies, spot and stalk or even walk and be surprised, or even sitting on your butt and glassing, on public or even private lands, rifle IMO.   Wink

Edited by supertool73 - January/11/2012 at 11:03
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My lightweight rifle is a Remington Model 7 w/ Douglas barrel in 7mm-08. Leupold PRW rings and bases topped by a Vortex Viper 2-7x32 BDC.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 10:43
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Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

 A high mileage DIY spot and stalk fair chase on public land mostly. 
[QUOTE]

That is the type of hunting probably 90% of Montanans do, and I dare say a high percentage of many other states. So you are not alone.  Although one thing I have learned is that high mileage isn't always the best.  The more you walk the less you really look around.  Lets face it.  In rugged terrain and high alititude, you have to watch where you step and walk as much or more than what is around you.  It may be better to hike your miles in, set up camp, and them spend less time hiking and more time glassing.

"DIY spot and stalk fair chase"  Man, that phrase is getting really annoying to me.  The fact is that you would use the type of rifle you use currently even if you were on a full guided hunt.  I can take you places in Montana (where I guided on public or private land, or "DIY") that will kick your @$$ for terrain.  And just because a hunt is guided doesn't mean it isn't fair chase.  I guided elk hunts on public land that covered 40,000+ acres of area, and trust me, it was fair chase.  

Anyway, maybe the point I am trying to make is that you would use the type of rifle and gear you talk about regardless of what hunting you are doing, so you don't need that phrase in every post about a rifle.


[QUOTE=rustic]
My Tikka alone weight just a tad over 6 pounds.
 
So what is the weight with scope, sling, and ammo?

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 11:42
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I agree. It's though everyone else is being painted as not fair chase. It is getting old.
In some states, feeding and baiting is legal. Some hunters sit in stands. I hunt sign in the deep woods of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I don't move a lot. Are all of these methods considered "not DIY FC"?
I have also been on guided western and Canadian hunts and these were definitely fair chase.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 15:16
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Originally posted by supertool73 supertool73 wrote:

I was going to suggest checking out the Browning Mountain TI rifles as well.  But Browning is not listing them on their site any more, they must have discontinued them.  The .308 I believe weighted in a 5lbs 7 oz.  I have the 300 WSM and it is 5lbs12oz I believe.  I have gotten 1/2 inch groups at 100 with little time spend on load, only 1 powder and 1 bullet.   They listed at around $1600 I believe, but I got mine for $800 new on gunbroker.  Makes me sad as I wanted one in 7mm-08 as well. 

They also have a short bolt lift, so you can use scopes with large eye pieces and mount them really low without any clearance issues.  They were stainless with synthetic stocks. 

Pretty easy packing for high, medium, or low mileage.  Crawling, walking, running, sprinting, stalking, fair or unfair chasing, doing it by myself or with my hunting buddies, spot and stalk or even walk and be surprised, or even sitting on your butt and glassing, on public or even private lands, rifle IMO.   Wink


Your a funny guy.Wink
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 15:22
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Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:

 A high mileage DIY spot and stalk fair chase on public land mostly. 
[QUOTE]

That is the type of hunting probably 90% of Montanans do, and I dare say a high percentage of many other states. So you are not alone.  Although one thing I have learned is that high mileage isn't always the best.  The more you walk the less you really look around.  Lets face it.  In rugged terrain and high alititude, you have to watch where you step and walk as much or more than what is around you.  It may be better to hike your miles in, set up camp, and them spend less time hiking and more time glassing.

"DIY spot and stalk fair chase"  Man, that phrase is getting really annoying to me.  The fact is that you would use the type of rifle you use currently even if you were on a full guided hunt.  I can take you places in Montana (where I guided on public or private land, or "DIY") that will kick your @$$ for terrain.  And just because a hunt is guided doesn't mean it isn't fair chase.  I guided elk hunts on public land that covered 40,000+ acres of area, and trust me, it was fair chase.  

Anyway, maybe the point I am trying to make is that you would use the type of rifle and gear you talk about regardless of what hunting you are doing, so you don't need that phrase in every post about a rifle.


[QUOTE=rustic]
My Tikka alone weight just a tad over 6 pounds.
 
So what is the weight with scope, sling, and ammo?


I guess what I mean is mostly not hunting behind high fences for monster hand feed elk and whitetails and shooting game from the hood or door of a truck and so on. sorry
Just a tad under 7 pounds.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 15:40
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Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

I agree. It's though everyone else is being painted as not fair chase. It is getting old.
In some states, feeding and baiting is legal. Some hunters sit in stands. I hunt sign in the deep woods of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. I don't move a lot. Are all of these methods considered "not DIY FC"?
I have also been on guided western and Canadian hunts and these were definitely fair chase.

Not at all. The reason I bring up the "fair chase" is the clothing, gear and rifle&scope is suggested to make that type of hunt(DIY FC S&S PL) more enjoyable and productive.
The setup I listed above will work poorly back east in tight trees. Just like my $400-$500 tikka with low end scope will not work very good in those conditions. Scope will not work in low light plus 4.5x14 wrong mag no reason what so ever for a light weight rifle.
If I was perceived to blanket all hunting with one is the best... not my intention at all.

sorry
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I understand what you mean.  But I have to admit, I have shot game right off the hood of the truck.  Works great for an afternoon hunt just for some meat.  I still consider that fair chase if it isn't in game farm though.  Still have to see them and recover them.

That is a nice light gun.  Lighter than many I have.  I am looking at building a new rifle and keeping it light, but it won't be that light because of the caliber I am looking at.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 15:47
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Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

I understand what you mean.  But I have to admit, I have shot game right off the hood of the truck.  Works great for an afternoon hunt just for some meat.  I still consider that fair chase if it isn't in game farm though.  Still have to see them and recover them.

That is a nice light gun.  Lighter than many I have.  I am looking at building a new rifle and keeping it light, but it won't be that light because of the caliber I am looking at.


What caliber are you looking at?
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 15:58
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375 Ruger probably will come in a touch over 8 lbs with scope.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 19:35
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An 8lb .375 is going to have some push to it. 
 
Ultralight tents:
 
My solo shelter is a Tarptent Contrail.  Iti s 24.5 ounces, under $200, and has plenty of room.  It is sweet.
 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: January/11/2012 at 20:06
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Scopes - Easily the first consideration for scope for me is weight and how compact then combination price/warranty-CS/Mag/glass to my eye/reputation/lack of hassle.
Wording this right... hunting the back country of the plains of the northern states and mountains of the western states on foot with no guide stand-less and bait-less. Because this is the only way I can afford 15 - 25 tags give or take... every year.
So I looked for(with some help from this forum) lightest low end scope I could find. First I came up with ever so slight used mark ar 3x9 mil-dot put that on .223 and loved it. It was super light easy to use(ranging) leupold gave me awesome CS on a used scope. The next scope I went with on my .308 with some help from this forum of course I went with leupold again because of the past experiences/service/reputation/etc. I went with the lightest low end scope I could find... leupold v-x3 4.5x14 CDS partly because of budget.
- I has been a great scope so far.
- have hunted with it 14 below to 90+ degree heat
- rain snow wind dust
- 3200 to over 10000 feet above sea level
To be fair someone on this forum told me it is the second worst scope in leupolds v-x3 lineup. That is something to look into before considering purchase. I have no complains so far.
http://www.leupold.com/hunting-and-shooting/products/scopes/vx-3-riflescopes/vx-3-4-5-14x40mm-cds/

Rings - I have been told on this forum talley rings are far superior to leupolds STD's Which it great because it sounds like they are half the weight and very reasonably priced.
http://swfa.com/Talley-Lightweight-Aluminum-1-Scopemount-P46967.aspx

Scope accessories - A big part hunting is making it so you don't have to fight your gear. Never will this be more important then with optics on top of your rifle. Dust rain snow have ever ruined a hunt? Setting a rifle down and not thinking about it and scope is covered with dust snow mud?
All of the above for me. Leupold make a great cover that screws right into the scope ends... is made out of the same aluminum as the scope. They keep the elements from even touching lens without obstructing any bit of view through lens and scope features. A bit on the pricey side but the light weight and build quality more than make up for it.
http://swfa.com/Leupold-Alumina-Lens-Cover-Kit-P7551.aspx

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile

    

Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:33
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Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

An 8lb .375 is going to have some push to it. 
 
Ultralight tents:
 
My solo shelter is a Tarptent Contrail.  Iti s 24.5 ounces, under $200, and has plenty of room.  It is sweet.
 

Nice
Have you used it much in the snow.

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I had six inches of snow on it, it bowed in quite a ways, but held.  It also stood up to some pretty good wind gusts once.
 
That said, it is an early season shelter for me.  The late season sees me finding shelter in a nice wall tent with a stoked stove and a propane lantern.
 
As far as the scope goes, I have had great luck with my little Vortex Viper.  I have also owned many Leupolds, and used them with success.  I have had the aluminas, and liked them better than BC covers, but the magnets came out a couple times, and, like the BCs, they still came open sometimes (especially when getting my rifle in and out of my Eberlestock backscabbard.
 
Now I use a scopecoat, and like it a lot.  It also protects the whole scope.
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Therm-a-Rest
Sleeping pads -

SmallRegularLarge
ColorRadiant YellowRadiant YellowRadiant Yellow
R-Value3.23.23.2
Weight8 oz / 230 g12 oz / 350 g1 lb / 460 g
Width20 in / 51 cm20 in / 51 cm25 in / 63 cm
Length47 in / 119 cm72 in / 183 cm77 in / 196 cm
Thickness2.5 in / 6.3 cm2.5 in / 6.3 cm2.5 in / 6.3 cm
Packed dimension9 x 3.3 in / 23 x 9 cm9 x 4.0 in / 23 x 10 cm11 x 4.5 in / 28 x 11 cm
Volumecu. in
Top fabric type30d High Tenacity Nylon30d High Tenacity Nylon30d High Tenacity Nylon
Bottom fabric type30d High Tenacity Nylon30d High Tenacity Nylon30d High Tenacity Nylon
CoreNylonNylongNylon
Country of OriginMade in Seattle, USAMade in Seattle, USA
These are great compress down to tiny and super light plus comfortable.

http://cascadedesigns.com/therm-a-rest/mattresses/fast-and-light/neoair-xlite/product


Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile


Edited by rustic - January/11/2012 at 21:31
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Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

I had six inches of snow on it, it bowed in quite a ways, but held.  It also stood up to some pretty good wind gusts once.
 
That said, it is an early season shelter for me.  The late season sees me finding shelter in a nice wall tent with a stoked stove and a propane lantern.
 
As far as the scope goes, I have had great luck with my little Vortex Viper.  I have also owned many Leupolds, and used them with success.  I have had the aluminas, and liked them better than BC covers, but the magnets came out a couple times, and, like the BCs, they still came open sometimes (especially when getting my rifle in and out of my Eberlestock backscabbard.
 
Now I use a scopecoat, and like it a lot.  It also protects the whole scope.


What is the size your tarptent packs down to? I use a three season tent it is a little on the bulky side.
Did you have any problem with leupold replacing aluminas? I have never had to take any accessories back to leupold.
My scopecoat that came with scope is awful tight to take on and off.

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Nice disclaimer rustic.  Guess we have given you enough crap abou it huh? Wink

For a scope, I look for quality glass and durability more than the few ounces of weight savings.  Not saying you have to spend 1000+, but I just like the best glass for the money combo and then for feature for the hunting style and gun I am shooting.

For a scope cover, I have actually gone away from flip ups of any kind.  I use the Scopeshield.  It was originally sent to me by a member here on this forum to test, and I can't say enough good about it after hunting with it in all conditions for the last few years.  It comes off faster than opening two covers.  Protects the whole scope, not just the lenses. 
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Gaiters - These are real nice pack light and small. Super easy to put on.

http://www.outdoorresearch.com/en/or-gear/gaiters/alpine/verglas-gaiters-m-s.html

Disclaimer: In no way saying this gear is better than any other just, I have used it under harsh varied conditions it passed with flying colors. When people I have hunted with this fall were fighting with their gear I was still out hunting. This may or may not work in a area near you. Smile
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Originally posted by helo18 helo18 wrote:

Nice disclaimer rustic.  Guess we have given you enough crap abou it huh? Wink

For a scope, I look for quality glass and durability more than the few ounces of weight savings.  Not saying you have to spend 1000+, but I just like the best glass for the money combo and then for feature for the hunting style and gun I am shooting.

For a scope cover, I have actually gone away from flip ups of any kind.  I use the Scope shield.  It was originally sent to me by a member here on this forum to test, and I can't say enough good about it after hunting with it in all conditions for the last few years.  It comes off faster than opening two covers.  Protects the whole scope, not just the lenses. 


The rifles I have are only $400-$500 Tikkas lower end scopes seem to suit them fine. Although the new savage I have on order might call for something a little "higher" up. Of course, the rifle only weighs 5.5 pounds. A set up weighing in at under 6 1/2 pounds would be sweet. Love
 http://www.savagearms.com/firearms/model/11LH

Scope shield is the brand? Might have to go that way if I don't go with leupold... to protect lens.
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Yes sir.  The ScopeShield. 

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Recoil pads? My tikka .308 has no real recoil. It has a limbsaver on it there is really no need for it. Does anyone know of a lighter better brand of pad? The limbsaver is quite heavy I did not realize that till tonight when I took it off.
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Originally posted by rustic rustic wrote:



What is the size your tarptent packs down to? I use a three season tent it is a little on the bulky side.
Did you have any problem with leupold replacing aluminas? I have never had to take any accessories back to leupold.
My scopecoat that came with scope is awful tight to take on and off.



The tarp tent packs down into almost nothing, like 12x4. I did not send the aluminas to Leupold, I epoxied the magnets back in. I have not had any trouble with the on/off of my scope coat.

I use a Thermarest Neoair mattress. I have Kenetrek gaiters that are similar in design, build and function to the
OR gaiters.
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