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Vintage Porros

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Topic: Vintage Porros
Posted By: Klamath
Subject: Vintage Porros
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 11:22
Every once and awhile it can be useful to back up a step and take a look at how things once were.  The other day I was surfing the bay in a 7x35 binocular search and found there were dozens of old porros from the golden era of Japanese porro production.  Back in the days of the Japan Telescope Inspection Institute, when all the binoculars were actually inspected and received a little golden sticker.  We were reaping rewards from that process such as few of us likely appreciated.
 
Anyway, my curiosity got the best of me, and I bought one.  Now everybody will roll on the floor laughing at me here, but of all things it's a....T.... a Ta... a Tasco!  There I said it.  A Tasco Model 400 International, 7x35 with a 604' (11.5*) fov.  That is an apparent fov of just a speck over 80*.  Now the first thing I noticed when I unboxed it was that this thing is a hefty, solid, built like a tank, double handful of prisms.  It just stands up and says "I am a quality binocular".  So I just sit there for a minute or two.  This thing is a Tasco for Pete's sakes!  So I finish looking it over for glitches, there were none I could see, other than a couple of scratches on the leatherette.  It said it had been used, but not abused.  OK, that was a start at least.
 
So I step out the door of the reloading/optics shop for a closer look.  I quickly set up the focus and checked collimation on a nearby power line, good... it's spot on.  So I start looking things over.  Huh, this is a Tasco?  Holy cow, this thing is pretty darn good!  Its better than pretty good in fact.  It is good enough that I will use it hunting or for anything else as a primary instrument and won't ever get the notion I really should have brought along something better, even if I could have.
 
Is there something better?  Don't fool yourself, yes there is something better.  The present day expansion of quality in roof prism binoculars is real, and that is a fact.  These old vintage porros are not quite that good, but they need offer no apologies either.  Sadly, there are also a lot of garbage porros out there that were cheap then and worthless now.  But instruments like this Tasco back in their day weren't particularly cheap.  They were not terrifically expensive either, but they weren't cheap.  They are quality today too.  Back in the day, Tasco and other companies with sullied reputations in today's reality, were actually quality optical companies with "production standards".  Tasco, imagine that!  Each one of the several hundred Japanese Optical firms stamped the hinge of the binocular with their designated mark.  J-B ### for the completed binocular and J-E ### for the metalwork.  Often as not there is just the J-B ###.  They then got the little oval JTII sticker.
 
This has been an interesting re-educational process for me.  In the process, I have gathered up maybe a dozen old porro binoculars.  Several Tasco, Jason, Binolux, Montgomery Wards, Sears, Canon, Carl Zeiss, Sans and Streriffe, Mastercraft, Holiday, and Swift.  Mostly I am interested in the Extra an Ultra Wide Angle B&L style 7x35 porros.  What I found was the Japanese porros were likely on the verge of greatness.  However mass marketing hysteria led to the JTII demise and ultimate elimination of across the board standards.  One of these old porros with state of the art glass and full modern broadband multi coatings would really stand up and sing.  They probably won't win a best of seven series in a presidential debate, but they won't get swept either.
 
These things today are pretty inexpensive.  I have spent no more than maybe $30.00 shipped.  Some have come out of collimation, so expect that.  In the process, I have learned how to take these old binoculars apart for cleaning and have been able to recollimate all but a couple.  That alone has been worth the small expense.
 
So if you don't wear glasses, and get bored, surf the bay and try a couple of these.  These older Ultra Wide Angle have NO eye relief, none.  I don't wear glasses and I have to take the eye cups off to get as close to the ocular lens as I can.  You can see the progression of the field seeming to expand as you get closer and closer to the oculars.  NOTHING on the market today is wide angle.  Eyeglass wearers probably can't get close enough to merge the images.  They are not real good for cold weather, as fogging gets to be a problem with little to no eye relief.  The focus grease will probably be a little stiff by now too, so the work a lot better when warm.  But re greasing the focus mechanism is no big chore either.
 
I have found several I will keep with the intent that they will get frequent use.  A Swift Audubon 8.5x44 from 1968, which WILL PUSH AN ALPHA, that one cost me $30.00.  A Swift Apollo 8x30 w/ 446' fov (this was a serious rebuild project that will also push the alpha) a Sans & Steriffe Viking 8x30 with a 525' fov, the Tasco 400 at 604', a Montgomery Wards with 620' fov.  I have several others at 578' fov from which I will keep one or two as well.
 
So depending on the level of interest shown in the subject I have lots of stuff I can add as needed.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron




Replies:
Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 13:38
  
 
 
I bought a Tasco 400 International about four years ago on eBay!!  Mint Condition.  I paid $10 plus $10 postage!!!  Roll on Floor Laughing
 
 
 7X35, just like yours!!  I love 'em!!  Very nice!!  Hardly ever been used.  Case and all. 
 
 
Great review!! 
 
 
 


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Bitterroot Bulls
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 13:53
I am fascinated by these binoculars as well.  I think I will start looking for my own steal on the Tascos.  I love my old Jena 8X30 mc.  A fine instrument. 

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-Matt


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 14:27
Steve,
 
I have approx. 20 Porro prism binoculars; quite a few are older, discontinued, made in Japan models that are built like a tank and are always ALOT of fun to use both daytime & nighttime.
There have also been several other Porro prism binoculars that I have given away, for one reason or another.
 
Thanks for sharing with us about your collection of vintage Porro binos. Thunbs Up
 
Stan


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 16:02
Originally posted by Bitterroot Bulls Bitterroot Bulls wrote:

I am fascinated by these binoculars as well.  I think I will start looking for my own steal on the Tascos.  I love my old Jena 8X30 mc.  A fine instrument. 
I have both a fully coated one from 1976 and a later multicoated one from 1986 that looks brand new. 
 
I wish I had done this when Son of Ed did.  His was a bargain.  There are still deals to be had, but $20-30/ per binocular with some shipping is getting to be the norm.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: February/19/2012 at 16:13
Originally posted by Bird Watcher Bird Watcher wrote:

Steve,
 
I have approx. 20 Porro prism binoculars; quite a few are older, discontinued, made in Japan models that are built like a tank and are always ALOT of fun to use both daytime & nighttime.
There have also been several other Porro prism binoculars that I have given away, for one reason or another.
 
Thanks for sharing with us about your collection of vintage Porro binos. Thunbs Up
 
Stan
The very first binocular I bought back in the days when I was a college junior was a Swift Nighthawk 8x40 porro with a 500' fov.  I still have that binocular, and several years ago I had it rebuilt.  Looking back I find out I never should have been able to get the extreme level of use out of a fragile old porro that I got out of that one Big Smile.
 
We took the marketters spiel about "roof prism superiority" hook, line, and sinker back in the day. Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa, I'm just as bad as anybody else.  Our modern roofs are wonderful, and I'll always have two or three.  I have gotten to the point where the current level of image performance is getting about as good as average human eyes can use.  While I recognize the superioroty of a modern alpha (sorry, but the superiority level is not enough to get over $2k out of me for one binocular) over the likes of the ZEN, Theron, Caldera,...etc mid price stuff, I somehow have the idea when I see the Prime HD, I'll maybe be done looking.  These old porros are a good way to keep up and expand the old optics hobby. 
 
Yeah, I'll always keep looking at the new roofs, but pretty soon we will see digital zoom stuff in hand held optics we won't hardly fathom now.  Kind of like the modern smartphone compared to the old fashioned bag type cell phones.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Simon Spiers
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 15:08
There are a few good wide angle porros of this era, Swift Audobon, Saratoga, but not the Apollo.
The Tasco 400 is OK has low index prisms making a shadow toward the field stops.
The Carl Zeiss Jena models ,8x30 7x50 and 10x50 are all goodies, but go for stupid money on ebay.
All the above have bugger all eye relief, will most likely need cleaning to get the best out of them.
I collect binoculars and have many,but these are a few worth mentioning.


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 15:37
Originally posted by Simon Spiers Simon Spiers wrote:

I collect binoculars and have many
 
Simon,
 
How close to 300 binoculars are you?
 
Stan


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 17:06
Originally posted by Simon Spiers Simon Spiers wrote:

There are a few good wide angle porros of this era, Swift Audobon, Saratoga, but not the Apollo.
The Tasco 400 is OK has low index prisms making a shadow toward the field stops.
The Carl Zeiss Jena models ,8x30 7x50 and 10x50 are all goodies, but go for stupid money on ebay.
All the above have bugger all eye relief, will most likely need cleaning to get the best out of them.
I collect binoculars and have many,but these are a few worth mentioning.
Simon,
 
Good to see you here on OT, welcome.  I would almost wager the money I have in the binocular that one look in my Swift Apollo MK II 8x30 and you'd change your tune.  It is remarkably like a small version of the Audubon type 4, physically as well as optically.
 
Nicholas Crista said he'd never seen a Apollo like this one and was pretty surprised at what he saw when he got into it.  He thought mine must have been a special edition and if I was smart I'd hang onto it.
 
I would like to see a good example of one of the golden age Japanese Porros with modern high quality glass and coatings as applicipacable to the design.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 17:20
Originally posted by Klamath Klamath wrote:

I would like to see a good example of one of the golden age Japanese Porros with modern high quality glass and coatings as applicipacable to the design.
Steve,
 
Nikon 'was' manufacturing the very best center focus Porro prism binocular until they discontinued it.
Here's a comment from a seller on ebay.
"The Nikon Premier SE 12x50 was designed to be the most optically advanced Porro Prism binocular in the world. According to Bettter View Desired, the highly regarded source for critical optics evaluation, the Nikon SE "exceeds the theoretical limit of resolution". Quite simply the SE has the best resolution of any binocular available. The cost of making such a fine optic became cost prohibitve and is no longer made. The MSRP was $1466 and could be bought retail (when still available) for around $800"
 
http://betterviewdesired.com/Nikon-Superior-E-8x32.php - http://betterviewdesired.com/Nikon-Superior-E-8x32.php
 
Stan. 


Posted By: NDhunter
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 17:47
Stan:
 
The Nikon SE is still in production, probably in small batches, and is available at several
sources, here in the US. 
The Ebay seller was correct in quoting the review on the great Nikon porro, they are very
good, and ranked among the very best, and that includes any of the current new roofs
from Nikon and the other alpha brands.  I have both the 8x32 and the 10x42 SE, and they
will be keepers. 
These are not vintage porros, but a current classic design.


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 19:43
Originally posted by NDhunter NDhunter wrote:

The Nikon SE is still in production, probably in small batches, and is available at several sources, here in the US. 
  
These are not vintage porros, but a current classic design.
 
I hear different stories from different sources.
Even SWFA does not list them on their website.
 
I know that they are not vintage, but, not everyone stocks them, and I keep hearing stories about their discontinuation.
Still, I don't think there is any better center focus technologly out there, in a Porro prism binocular.
 
Stan


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: February/24/2012 at 20:22
Originally posted by Bird Watcher Bird Watcher wrote:

Originally posted by Klamath Klamath wrote:

I would like to see a good example of one of the golden age Japanese Porros with modern high quality glass and coatings as applicable to the design.
Steve,
 
Nikon 'was' manufacturing the very best center focus Porro prism binocular until they discontinued it.
Here's a comment from a seller on ebay.
"The Nikon Premier SE 12x50 was designed to be the most optically advanced Porro Prism binocular in the world. According to Bettter View Desired, the highly regarded source for critical optics evaluation, the Nikon SE "exceeds the theoretical limit of resolution". Quite simply the SE has the best resolution of any binocular available. The cost of making such a fine optic became cost prohibitve and is no longer made. The MSRP was $1466 and could be bought retail (when still available) for around $800"
 
http://betterviewdesired.com/Nikon-Superior-E-8x32.php - http://betterviewdesired.com/Nikon-Superior-E-8x32.php
 
Stan. 
I'm like Jerry here.  I think the 8x32 SE is certainly in the discussion someplace (depending on who's making the list) to make the list of all time great binoculars.  I also do not regard them as vintage either.  My strictly narrow, even personal idea of vintage Japanese porros coincides with the life span of the Japan Telescope Inspection Service and those binoculars bearing their little yellow stickers.  Certainly I think the Carl Zeiss Jenna and some others of German lineage as vintage as well.
 
I tend to disagree that it is expensive to make a porro like the SE, or to fully modernize a Swift Holiday or Tasco 400 or many other Japanese porros.  It would be if the design had a goal to increase the eye relief.  That gets into eye piece designs that are certainly neither simple nor are they inexpensive.  The basic "Vintage Porro Prism Binocular Design" I should think is no secret.  The engineering work is done.  What I mean I wanted to see is one of those old porros with no changes to the design (apologies to eye glass wearers), just modern quality glass and state of the art broadband coatings.  I realize that they will carry edge softness due to the fact that the eye piece designs are likely stretched to and even somewhat past any reasonable design limit in these grand old Extra-Ultra Wide Angle porros.  Only some of the softness around the field stop can be attributed to Simon's post about low indexing prisms (mostly Bk-7).  The thing is that these fields are wide enough that the edge really becomes a non issue.
 
Designers decided to go roof when it became apparent that phase correction was on the way and that could tout the, compact size, better waterproofing, and more rugged design of the roof.  I think the engineers simply got tired of the old porro and saw more money ahead in roof prisms.  Not to mention the fact of a whole new set of engineering issues , more interesting  unknown work ahead with the roof.  Ramp up the marketing, end of story.  I think you won't see more 8x32 SE's (in great numbers anyway) simply because they would simply cut the sales of the EDG.  That's why we don't see them, not because they are too expensive.  That and the fact the "Optics Marketing and Binocular Re-educational Program" has reaped its rewards.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Simon Spiers
Date Posted: February/25/2012 at 15:21
Originally posted by Bird Watcher Bird Watcher wrote:

Originally posted by Simon Spiers Simon Spiers wrote:

I collect binoculars and have many
 
Simon,
 
How close to 300 binoculars are you?
 
Stan

300 is in the rear view mirror Stan!


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My binoculars http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars - My binocular collection


Posted By: vintagefan
Date Posted: March/07/2012 at 14:50
One thing that people forget, or perhaps don't quite realize, is that during the 1950's-1980's most of the familiar brands of binoculars (Tasco, Swift, Sans & Streiffe, Jason, Binolux, Wards, Sears, United, Bushnell, Kalimar, Compass, Selsi and others) were simply acting as distributors for products that were manufactured by others. In some cases, a single brand was buying from a bunch of different manufacturers. Just to give an example in doing research for www.miniaturebinoculars.com  I discovered that those small binoculars (6x15, 7x18, etc) manufactured by Seiwa Kogaku (JB93) were sold or distributed as Binolux, Carton, Compass, Cosmica, Empire, Gold Cup, Greencat, Hoya, Jason, Kaliamar, King, Look, Olympic, Optix, Orion, Petlux, Raiya, Scope, Sears, Selsi, Simor, SUI, Telsar, Vista, Yamatar, and Yashika. And I suspect the list is really several times as long as what I can document so far, because I add more each week. Plus keep in mind I was not even looking at the larger binoculars, where the same thing was occurring. Omori Sogo Kogaku did exactly the same, and had just as long a list of brands they were sold or distributed as, and so did Tochihara & Akebono optical companies. Even Asahi (Pentax) made binoculars for others, and particularly Bushnell early on. So during the period of Japanese manufacture, the quality of a particular pair of binoculars doesn't really have nearly so much to do with the brand name that was marked on them as it did the JB manufacturer's code of which company actually made them, and a brand's quality could be all over the place. depending on who they were buying what models from. Of course the brands are still engaged in contract manufacturing, but with China the product is much more built to a specification and a price point for the brand reseller, so that an economy brand now tends to have a more reliably economy quality level.

Mark


Posted By: ringmaster
Date Posted: March/08/2012 at 04:41
very informative.......thanks vintagefan


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: March/16/2012 at 22:42
I have a pair of Spindler & Hoyer 8X45 binos from Gottingen, Germany.  Probably 1960s maybe.  Virtually impossible to find Internet photos of them to post here.  Really nice binoculars from the mid-sixties. 
 
If anybody knows anything about Spindler & Hoyer, I would be interested to hear any news.  I know that they quit making optics about forty years ago and concentrated on scientific instruments and lasers, etc.  I understand that they were absorbed by the LINOS Group a few years ago.     


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: March/28/2012 at 19:57
  
 
 
 
 


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/31/2012 at 15:31
Hey, Vintage Guys!  Look what I found just now on eBay!!   2 more days to go!!
 
 
 
 
 
 
A Tasco model 116!   One of the old Good Ones of the 100 series.  7x 35    551 FOV.     $20 on eBay so far.....
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Tasco-Binoculars-7-X-35-/200767274689?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebea97ec1 - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Tasco-Binoculars-7-X-35-/200767274689?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebea97ec1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/31/2012 at 23:02
I have one of those too.  All those old Tasco vintage porros are pretty decent.  I have maybe six different Tascos of that vintage.  The 116 is right there with them.

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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Simon Spiers
Date Posted: August/17/2012 at 07:37
Some of the other nice Japanese porros are the Yashica 10x50 models, but the best of the never heard of range includes the wonderful Mirador birding binocular(see my site below).
Also the Nipon Kogaku (Nikon) models, although more expensive are a great choice.
Then the Swifts, most of the range are good, Saratoga Sport King, Audubon, Skipper......
Cool




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My binoculars http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars - My binocular collection


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/02/2014 at 16:24
Greetings to all on this forum - hope you are still monitoring it.

Just came across this forum a couple of months ago, it rekindled my interest in vintage porro-prism binos.

Glad to see there are other like-minded "vintage bino fans" out there!

Klamath - agree with your comment in your original post from 19 February 2012:
"What I found was the Japanese porros were likely on the verge of greatness."   

   I too have collected some vintage binos, including several Japanese ones from the Japan Telescope Inspection Institute (JTII) "golden era".     

We own several vintage porro-prism binos, all with their original leather cases & accessories:

- Stesco 7x35 - made in France, vintage early 1960s
Have been in our family since new, just received them back from a complete professional restoration.

- Consort 7x35 - Japan(manufacturer: JB4 Toei Kogaku Co. Ltd.)

- Manon 10x50 - Japan (manufacturer: JB191: Seiwa Optical Co., Ltd.)

- KMart 7x50 - Japan (manufacturer: JB133 Kamakura Koki Co. Ltd.)

All are of high quality construction, materials and optics and would cost a small fortune to duplicate today, especially if made in Japan, Germany/Europe. I have have learned to do the needed maintanenance, lubrication, optics cleaning and collimation to keep them in good working order.

   The quality standards imposed by the JTII on its Japanese manufacturers resulted in a very high quality of optics for the consumer which we took for granted at the time.

   Despite the unarguable brightness, light transmission and clarity advantages of the modern binos we own, I find I still turn to our vintage "black pebble grain / all metal / leather case" binoculars to take on a trip, a hike, etc. There is, to me, something inherently more satisfying in holding these in my hand and using them - and I don't feel I am giving up much in the way of image quality.

   I also find our vintage binos, both French and Japanese, are typically easier on the eyes than some of the newer binos I have used.
I have never experienced eye strain after prolonged use of our vintage binos, but I have with some modern binos - almost as if the image is too bright for long-term use.

It's difficult to define this "non eye-straining" quality of the vintage binos, nothing to do with collimation issues, exit pupil size or anything else I can quantify.

Some of you may have noticed this too and I would be curious to hear your feedback and impressions.

I look forward to continuing this discussion on this forum!

All the best      

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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/02/2014 at 21:42
I have a couple of vintage porros that surely do possess the nice bright, easy on the eye view.  In fact two of them, the Bushnell Rangemaster, the early Fuji Photo Optical, needs not back down from just about anything we can buy today.  As far as I can tell it came off the Fuji line in late 1952.  Just single coated, but fully coated, everything has coating.  I was really not prepared for the view I saw.  It needs to be seen to be believed.  

The same thing applies to the Baush & Lomb Zephyr.  Mine is a rarer 8x30 model.  It had to go off for cleaning, but it needs not take backseat even to the lauded Nikon 8x32 SE.  It has a serial number that puts it being made in 1951. 


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/03/2014 at 11:12
Of the vintage binos I own, the best one optically is probably the Manon 10x50, though I suspect it may fall a little short of your Bausch & Lomb Rangemaster and Zephyr and Fuji binoculars.

Specs on these Manon 10x50:
-5.5 degree field
-288 ft field of view at 1000 yds.
-marked JB191 & JE17.

my assessement:
Very sharp focus out to approx 80%+ of image, very slight softeness at edge of image beyond that point. Good control of chromatic aberration too, which I was pleasantly surprised at considering the age of these binos. Optically compare very favorably with some of the US Army Issue M22 7x50 Fujinon and US issue and German army issue Steiner binoculars I have used during a 24 year career.   


The coating on the objective lens of this Manon bino puzzles me though, hope you may have some insight.

It is not the typical light bluish-purple MgF2 of that era which all our other vintage binos have.

Looking at the objective lens surface, I see a distinct yellowish gold tint, more metallic gold than amber, but also reflects an undertone of light purple when reflecting natural light. Have not seen this in any other vintage binos I have run across.
   
The ocular lenses, however, appear to be MGF2 coated, definitely not the same coating as the objective side.

I do have a question on dating a binocular by serial number - what reference documents do you use? I would like to do this for the ones we own.

I am looking at a few possible Swift 8.5 x44 Audubon binos, a bino I have always liked when borrowing from friends but never owned. will post on this forum if I manage to buy one at a decent price.


All the best     


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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/03/2014 at 11:33
I don't think that dating will prove very rewarding.  Most of those companies are long gone and it seems so are whatever historical references they may have been able to produce.  There may have been some realistic expectations from dating by serial number when the company was active and the information was available.  Some, notably Swift had the year of manufacture as the first two digits of the serial number.  Swift has a historical and collectors following, so information there is easier to get.

There was a "Fully Amber Coated" phase some manufacturers went through.  I do not know, nor have I been able to find out just what amber coating was.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/04/2014 at 11:00
Thanks for that info - I won't pursue trying to date those binoculars.

All the best,


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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/09/2014 at 19:37
I just came home and found a package on my doorstep!  Big Grin    I did an ebay thing the other day. I couldn't help myself.  I got a pair of binoculars that looked really clean.  They are!!

Manon 7X50 in about 98% pristine condition plus case.....umm.....$9.99 plus postage!!  They are perfect!!  Smile



hee hee  















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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/10/2014 at 21:38
Want a real WOW? Smile Find a Sears Discoverer 7x50 WA with a 525 or 578' fov.

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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/11/2014 at 08:31
I got one of the Sears Discoverers! .  Ebay.  I paid about $33 to my doorstep!  Bucky





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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/11/2014 at 09:54
The Discoverer are pretty much undiscovered.  The wide field with the depth perception of a long length porro is kind of a neat experience.  There are a couple of different Discoverers, one with a standard flat prism plate and another with a sloped shoulder prism plate.  The amber coatings can be sort of susceptible to nicotine film if from a smokers environment. 

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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/11/2014 at 10:35
Oh.  I have the ones with the sloped shoulder look.  Are the other Discoverers good, too? 





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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/11/2014 at 10:40
Oh! I have a question.  What about the Sears 8 X50 binculars?  430 feet @ 1000 yds?  


-1377480366IMGP4959


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/17/2014 at 08:53
I also bought a vintage Manon bino in Feb on eBay

paid a total of $16.49 !! price: $9.99 +ship:   $6.50
10x50, model 4026, Came with origianl leather covered hard case, OEM lens capsa w/ M<anon logo, OEM cleaning cloth and yellow prees-on filters for the eyepieces in the OEM Manon-marked Ziploc bag - was just missing the bino strap.
They are in excelent to near-mint condition, no visible paint wear or other signs of external wear and tear - and the optics are crystal clear, have an amber lens coating.

Great image, easy on the eyes during prolonged use
After the 1961 Swift Audubons, this is probably my favorite go-to bino

JB191 Seiwa Optical Co., Ltd., Wako-Shi
JE17 Otake Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo

FOV: 5.5 degrees
288 ft @ 1,000 yds



Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

I just came home and found a package on my doorstep!  Big Grin    I did an ebay thing the other day. I couldn't help myself.  I got a pair of binoculars that looked really clean.  They are!!

Manon 7X50 in about 98% pristine condition plus case.....umm.....$9.99 plus postage!!  They are perfect!!  Smile



hee hee  















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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/17/2014 at 17:49
Yes....my 7X50s have gold in the front, bluish in the oculars.  Very clear and bright.  I got an inexpensive Nikon ( NOS ) strap from ebay to put on it.  Case is very good.  Oh! I also got two yellow ocular filters with it.   

Cruising for bargain binoculars is addicting.  


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/18/2014 at 13:00
Addicting it is !

Have bought several vintage binos - when I see one that gets my attention I try to justify to myself that I really don't need another bin - but sometimes that fails and the collection keeps growing.....!

I really like my Manon 10x50s, seems like you got a very nice set in 7x35!

   My most recent acquisition, about 2 weeks ago, is a 1961 Swift Audubon 8.5x44 with case and orig. leather bino strap - but no other accessories. I plan on usoing these regularly and want to keep lenses protectd so I found a batch of OEM Swift lens caps on eBay just this morning and ordered them.    
   Good, clear optics, no fungus/other contamination, with a very few small specks of dust inside which do not impair the image quality at all - I'll get around to cleaning those out soon.


I am trying to post photos of the binos I own, but I have yet to figure out how to do this on this forum. . When drafting my post, I click on the 'Insert Image' icon but it prompts me to enter the web address of the image - my photos are on the C drive of my computer, not on the web.

Appreciate your help, since I see your photos on the thread and have obviously figured it out!   


Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

Yes....my 7X50s have gold in the front, bluish in the oculars.  Very clear and bright.  I got an inexpensive Nikon ( NOS ) strap from ebay to put on it.  Case is very good.  Oh! I also got two yellow ocular filters with it.   

Cruising for bargain binoculars is addicting.  


-------------
All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/18/2014 at 13:55
What specific Sears Discoverers did you get and how do you like them?
Appreciate seeing your feedback/evaluation on those.

I remember a set of Sears binos we used to have in the 70s which we had bought new at our local Sears.

They were a 7x50 if I remember correctly, and I recall them having a very good image quality.

Would like to own a good vintage Sears bino again so that will likely be my next buy. As you said, it IS addicting - but not too expensive if you search carefully!   


thanks




Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

Oh.  I have the ones with the sloped shoulder look.  Are the other Discoverers good, too? 





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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/18/2014 at 20:35
( You have to have 50 posts in order to post a picture...)

I have the sloped-shouldered Discoverers. Model 6267.  Very clear...but the image seems to be lighter than my other binoculars.  I don't know if it's the Amber Coating or if they are dusty inside.  They are not dusty outside.  

Here's some ebay pictures.  They are cleaner now.  I cut the strap off and replaced with leather.   




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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/19/2014 at 20:52
Ed

Thanks for sharing picture, looks very nice! Got it on the 50-post min to post photos.

My Manon 10x50s were slightly dusty inside when I first got them - just fine dust. Cleaned them, easy job as it was mostly the inside of the objective lenses, and slight cleaning of prism faces. It did improve the image. Just be careful to not affect collimation when you take them apart and re-assemble them. I marked the position of eccentric collimation rings at objectives and reassembled them - no issue.

Those Manons have amber coating but seem to have no lighter an image than my other binos.


I'll keep looking, There is a Sears 6267 very similar to yours for sale on Ebay now, as well as a few others decent looking ones, some are discovers - one is 7X15X35 Zoom Discoverer w/ case, appears to be very clean. Orig owner. Don't know though, as I have never owned a variable power zoom models. Any thoughts ?



QUOTE=Son of Ed] ( You have to have 50 posts in order to post a picture...)

I have the sloped-shouldered Discoverers. Model 6267.  Very clear...but the image seems to be lighter than my other binoculars.  I don't know if it's the Amber Coating or if they are dusty inside.  They are not dusty outside.  

Here's some ebay pictures.  They are cleaner now.  I cut the strap off and replaced with leather.   


[/QUOTE]

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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/19/2014 at 21:25
I had a zoom binocular back in 1980 ( a Bushnell ) and it was horrible.  As the power went up the image got destroyed. At 7 or 8X it was OK... But it was just no good, overall.  I would stay with fixed powers.  

I used to get headaches after using them.  


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/19/2014 at 23:19
Friends don't let friends buy zoom binoculars Big Smile.  http://www.bigbinoculars.com/nozooms.htm

Zooms are generally a bad idea.  The article in the link will explain'.
The Sears Discover binoculars both the slope shoulder and the conventional flat prism plate are generally good binoculars.  You see the 7x35 versions much more commonly than the 7x50's.

If you want a real WOW from a vintage porro glass I advise a Bushnell Rangemaster.  These come in the conventional flat prism plate style (the early one from Fuji Photo Optical) and a slope shoulder version along the lines of the Discoverer in Ed's post (the later style from Tamron).  Pretty much nothing will embarrass one of those.  Ditto a Baush & Lomb Zephyr.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/20/2014 at 09:20
Yes....I have read about the quality of those oldies.  However, I can't help but think that I can get a new Zen Ray ZRS for the price of those 50 year old Rangemasters and Zephyrs.  

If I am approaching the $100 mark ( or higher ) in my 'shopping' , I am now in the attitude that I had better be searching for a Real Bargain of the Century, something like a Zeiss or an old Hensoldt or a Swift Audubon...because I am now in New Binocular Territory at those prices.  

If you can get Leupold Yosemites for $85-100 range, you have to weigh that against what you are bidding on.

...once you get up into the mid-hundreds and $200 range, you are in new Zen-Ray country.  

I like to find stuff that can be had for under $35!!  



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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/20/2014 at 09:26
When it comes to binoculars, I am down here in YARD SALE level!!  Roll on Floor Laughing I just try to get some that are decent and work correctly.  I am happy seeing things magnified and not get a headache.  I would love to have big State-of-the-Art Optics, but I wouldn't be able to give a review of them...I would just be able to look through them and say: BOY! THAT LOOKS REAL GOOD!   






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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: April/25/2014 at 12:20
I am in the same boat with Ed. I look at the bargains I can find on ebay and other such sites.

I do own some new binos, but I love the look/quality feel of the vintage "black pebble grain" era porro prism binos I grew up with.
The best of the vintage ones I own leave me feeling I'm not giving up a whole lot vs. the new binos out there.

I just recently bought a 1961 Swift 8.5 x 44 Audubon on ebay - probably the best of all my vintage binos, it rivals the newest Nikons I own with modern lens coatings: Nikon Egret 8x40s porro.
The Swifts have a good image even in the dark, great depth of field and a 420 FT @ 1000yd FOV. What I really like about them is how easy they on my eyes during prolonged use and have a crisp, clear image except for just a little softness at the edge.
Pretty impressive specs too for a bino from 1961:
-BaK4 prisms
-Neoprene gasket selaed to keep dirt out (but not waterproof)
probably why they had perfectly clear optics when I received them
-twist up/down aluminum eyecups
-fully coated glass (this was before multi-coating was developed)


Good luck on your ongoing search for bargains. The good news is if you keep looking diligently you'll come across some great finds on occasion!



-------------
All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/25/2014 at 15:07
I like a bargain as well as the next guy.  With the exception of my two 7x35 Bushnell Rangemasters, a Bushnell Custom 7x35, and a Baush & Lomb Zephyr 8x30 I have not paid much over $40 for any of my vintage porros.

As far as Ed's getting getting into new binocular price territory, get a Zephyr 8x 30 side by side with ANY of today's $2-300 porros and get back to me on how much the new is better than the Zephyr...they just are not better.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/25/2014 at 18:31
I have seen Zephyrs on ebay for about $299 in mint condition.  Are the Zephyrs better than the Zeiss Jenoptem?  I have seen them go for less than $200 in great shape.  

I thought the new stuff was going to be better than the 50-60 year old stuff.  But, I can't compare, I don't have a Zephyr or any new 8X30.  And, aren't the Yosemites waterproof?     






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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: April/25/2014 at 22:16
Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

I have seen Zephyrs on ebay for about $299 in mint condition.  Are the Zephyrs better than the Zeiss Jenoptem?  I have seen them go for less than $200 in great shape.  

I thought the new stuff was going to be better than the 50-60 year old stuff.  But, I can't compare, I don't have a Zephyr or any new 8X30.  And, aren't the Yosemites waterproof?     





That is on the high side for a Zephyr.  It better be NIB  clean for that much.  I paid $249 for mine.  They had little exterior wear, a 90% case, the original box and the original B&L owners manual, just like what you would have gotten when new.  This is where it gets tricky buying used vintage stuff.  They were advertised as missing a screw on eye cup, no big deal I had a couple that would fit, and in general good working order and clean inside.  They were frozen solid, the hinge would not flex, the focus would not move.  I could not get the glass apart myself to clean it.  I let the seller have it in an email and he eventually refunded a bunch of the price.  I sent them off to Nicholas Crista for refurbishing (best money I ever spent on a binocular service job).  I am into them for $250 and you can't better them but precious little with a Nikon SE.  I still am trying to get around the idea these were made in 1951.  The Zephyr cost about $150 in post WW II economy which was like $1,500 in today's $$.  Totally made in the USA binocular, maybe even the last such when B&L went to Japan in the 70's.  The last were made in 1986.

The 8x30 and 9x35 Zephyrs are the rare ones.  Back in the day B&L pushed the 7x35 as the best all around size, so there are quite a few of those.  Good 7x35's can be found for $75 or so.  They also came in 6x30 and 7x50.

I would say the Zephyr kicks the butt of both of my Jenoptems, including my multi coated Jenoptem from the last  production year of 1986.

Yes the Yosemite is waterproof Smile.  But it does not focus nearly as smoothly as the Zephyr and...well they are different animals.  I have recommended a Yosemite many times in the past and will continue to do so, they are remarkable for their price point.

Best deal I ever got was a Swift Audubon 8.5x44 from 1968 for $20.  They are perfect optically and needed no cleaning or repair at all.

In point of fact, most of the newer stuff will be better than the older vintage models.  I think we get so tied up in reading about all the new fangled bells and whistles of today's wonder glass it does a lot of good to get hold of a golden oldie (alpha for their time) porro and let it speak for itself.


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/27/2014 at 11:09


Waiting for Klamath to come back.....




















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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: April/27/2014 at 11:13

" By the time he comes back on, Eduardo will have forgotten what he was going to ask him..."   








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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: May/02/2014 at 14:27
Steve - appreciate the input on Bausch & Lomb Zephyrs.

I have been wanting to find one for years now since borrowing an 7x35 Zephyr from a neighbor on a hunting trip when I was a Senior in high school (1977 - OK, I'm dating myself!) I was very, very impressed.

I have been searching ebay, other auction sites and visiting pawn shops / flea markets, optics stores that carry vinbtage binos, etc. on and off for the past ten+ years.   
For the most part the Zephyrs I have come across were either nice but overpriced, or beat up and overpriced for their condition. I have lost out on several ebay auctions for Zephyrs that went too high - typically in the last hours of a bidding "feeding frenzy".
I have noticed that almost all I have seen have been 7x35s, which tracks with your coomments about these being the most common. I have come across only four or so 8x30s and 7x50s during this time out of the dozens and dozens I have seen, and no 9x35s or 6x30s that I can recall.

Perseverance does pay off - if you persevere long enough! I just bought an 8x30 Zephyr on ebay today; $137.24 total including shipping. Has the original black leather case/strap & bino strap. Binos in very good optical condition, all leather also in very good condition according to the photos and my correspondence with the vendor.

Will post an update when I receive them, quite happy to finally have added one to my collection!


QUESTION to all on this forum:
Does anyone know if there is a way to date these?
For Swift binos, the last 2 digits of the year of manufacture is part of the serial # - don't know if it's that easy for Zephyrs.

Appreciate any feedback.


Originally posted by Klamath Klamath wrote:

Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

I have seen Zephyrs on ebay for about $299 in mint condition.  Are the Zephyrs better than the Zeiss Jenoptem?  I have seen them go for less than $200 in great shape.  

I thought the new stuff was going to be better than the 50-60 year old stuff.  But, I can't compare, I don't have a Zephyr or any new 8X30.  And, aren't the Yosemites waterproof?     






That is on the high side for a Zephyr.  It better be NIB  clean for that much.  I paid $249 for mine.  They had little exterior wear, a 90% case, the original box and the original B&L owners manual, just like what you would have gotten when new.  This is where it gets tricky buying used vintage stuff.  They were advertised as missing a screw on eye cup, no big deal I had a couple that would fit, and in general good working order and clean inside.  They were frozen solid, the hinge would not flex, the focus would not move.  I could not get the glass apart myself to clean it.  I let the seller have it in an email and he eventually refunded a bunch of the price.  I sent them off to Nicholas Crista for refurbishing (best money I ever spent on a binocular service job).  I am into them for $250 and you can't better them but precious little with a Nikon SE.  I still am trying to get around the idea these were made in 1951.  The Zephyr cost about $150 in post WW II economy which was like $1,500 in today's $$.  Totally made in the USA binocular, maybe even the last such when B&L went to Japan in the 70's.  The last were made in 1986.

The 8x30 and 9x35 Zephyrs are the rare ones.  Back in the day B&L pushed the 7x35 as the best all around size, so there are quite a few of those.  Good 7x35's can be found for $75 or so.  They also came in 6x30 and 7x50.

I would say the Zephyr kicks the butt of both of my Jenoptems, including my multi coated Jenoptem from the last  production year of 1986.

Yes the Yosemite is waterproof Smile.  But it does not focus nearly as smoothly as the Zephyr and...well they are different animals.  I have recommended a Yosemite many times in the past and will continue to do so, they are remarkable for their price point.

Best deal I ever got was a Swift Audubon 8.5x44 from 1968 for $20.  They are perfect optically and needed no cleaning or repair at all.

In point of fact, most of the newer stuff will be better than the older vintage models.  I think we get so tied up in reading about all the new fangled bells and whistles of today's wonder glass it does a lot of good to get hold of a golden oldie (alpha for their time) porro and let it speak for itself.





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All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/02/2014 at 17:47
Yes, Zephyrs can be dated.  There is lettering to indicate this.  Don't have it right handy, but post the serial number complete with letters and it can be done easily.

Edit:  This photo comes from Simon Spiers collection.  Simon posts here time to time.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/7557689202/


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/02/2014 at 19:13
How are the Hensoldt Fero 16 8X30s?  We see them on ebay all the time.  I understand that they are, like, impossible to get into for cleaning...I was wondering if they are a good binocular even if they are 20-30 years old and used.






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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/02/2014 at 22:28
Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

How are the Hensoldt Fero 16 8X30s?  We see them on ebay all the time.  I understand that they are, like, impossible to get into for cleaning...I was wondering if they are a good binocular even if they are 20-30 years old and used.

Sometimes there are some examples of poorly repaired binoculars where the binocular was literally glued back together.  This is particularly true of the immediate post WW II era.  Things were a mess and anything that might be sold was dug from rubble and "fixed".  This has obviously led to some "tales".  Some true and some not.  There is nothing inherent in the design of any of those German 8x30 that preclude them being taken apart for servicing.

The Hensoldt should be a pretty decent binocular.  Holger Merlitz points out the early 1950's makrolon plastic body was prone to irreversible damage.

http://www.holgermerlitz.de/edf7x40.html


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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: coyote95
Date Posted: May/13/2014 at 19:07
Here is a pair of 10x50's that I've had sense the early 70's I'm pretty sure they came from Sears & Roebuck.The fov seems to be pretty narrow compared to the newer stuff. The glass is surprising good!
http://s906.photobucket.com/user/coyote95/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-05/12AC61E2-45EE-4262-B2DC-5E53299CE0FB.jpg.html">
http://s906.photobucket.com/user/coyote95/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-05/5C1DF25A-CBDC-42EA-9351-E11AAAD36BCB.jpg.html">
http://s906.photobucket.com/user/coyote95/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-05/5C3A512E-5510-49D1-874A-6FA3FBCBEA5D.jpg.html">
http://s906.photobucket.com/user/coyote95/media/Mobile%20Uploads/2014-05/49F56A01-9F82-4544-8684-7FBB4BCC4652.jpg.html">


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"Life is like riding a bicycle . To keep balance you must keep moving" Albert Einstein


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/14/2014 at 19:12
They may have come from Sears, but Hulda is not the Sears brand binocular name, that is Discovery.  You are right in that they have a narrow fov.  The angular 5* fov is only an apparent fov of 50*.  Typically an afov of 60* is considered wide field.  Those old porros do have some pretty impressive images.

The JB-149 indicates the binocular was built by   Urawa Kogaku Seiki Seisakujo Co. Ltd.

The JE 28 indicates the body was supplied by  Fuji Seinñtsukiki Seisakujo Inc

Talk about a couple of mouthfuls!  This is the first time I have seen either of those two names show up on a binocular...which means very little Big Smile




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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: coyote95
Date Posted: May/16/2014 at 10:02
Thanks for the information on these Steve.    

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"Life is like riding a bicycle . To keep balance you must keep moving" Albert Einstein


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/22/2014 at 18:49
I couldn't resist any longer.  I ordered a Russian Baigish 8X30 binocular from some outfit in China.  Manufactured by KOMZ in Kazan, Russia.  I will let you know how they are when they arrive.    







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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 14:30
Chinese duplicity Ed, they say Made in Russia, but they are not Smile.  However they are probably pretty decent.  I'm interested in seeing what you have to say about how well they perform.

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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Bitterroot Bulls
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 18:21
I have some Russian 8X30s.  They are sharp enough but they are kind of dim and have a strong color bias.

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-Matt


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 18:35
$39 plus $2 postage   Bucky

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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Bitterroot Bulls
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 19:41
I think mine were around there, but it took a long time to get them shipped from Europe.

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-Matt


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 21:26
Some of the true Russian KOMZ or Bagaish porros seem to be decent from what I have seen posted elsewhere.  There was a discussion, Bird Forum I think, in several places where the Chinese Made in Russia knock offs came up.

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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/23/2014 at 21:36
The Chinese knock-offs look slightly different and don't have central focusing, and don't have enough serial numbers....I hope these are genuine...

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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/29/2014 at 21:30
I got my Baigish binoculars today!!!  Big Grin  They look good to me!!  





I saw one advertiser on ebay who actually claimed that the binoculars were not GENUINE BAIGISH!!  He wanted $59 plus postage.  His photos were different from the ones I got!  His binoculars had the writing on the opposite prisms!  The serial number only had seven digits!  My binocular has got an 8-digit serial number and BAK 4 prisms!  

I got some instructions in....Russian!!  BAK 4 prisms...I can see that by holding the binos at arms length and see a circular exit pupil.   

Anyway, they are exceedingly clear.  I guess about a 60% sweet spot.  No CA that I can find.....

What the Hell....for $41 !!!   Buy one!!!    



http://www.ebay.com/itm/181112818283?_trksid=p2055120.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT












m


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/30/2014 at 06:46
UPDATE:  Yesterday I was pretty exhausted after a very busy two days.  Now, I am a little more awake. 

These Baigish binoculars have a slight rose color coating on the lenses.  Very cool 3D effect.  I don't see any rolling ball effect.  150M/1000 yds.  ( still trying to figure that out in feet....450 feet? )  

They are very lightweight.  The little strap-holder slots are too small to put regular skinny straps through them....I guess I'll put some rawhide through there and tie a knot and make a loop, so I can connect my binocular strap to these guys.  

The above photos are from the ebay ad that I ordered from.  That's what I got.  Cardboard box with polar bears, little black zippy bag,  a plastic rain cover for the oculars,  and a chintsy little strap that resembles Bret Maverick's string tie.  

But, for the price, I am tickled with my new toy!  ( If the lenses fall out tomorrow, I will not be happy! )  


 

  


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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/31/2014 at 11:46
Welp....there are a couple of Swift Audubons on the ebay website this week....they both look clean as new!  Probably 45 years old.  Look gorgeous.  How are these rated compared to today's stuff?  What would be a sensible value on these fellers?  We're looking at about $11 postage....















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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: May/31/2014 at 19:02
Ed,

Those things are excellent, even superb by today's standards no less.  They are heavy as the dickens and you won't be packing them a long ways.

They look to be the type 2 b made between 1980-84.  They sold for about $205 in those days.  I think Hiyoshi made those for Swift.  Their weight is a bit over 38.0 oz.

Those should have a tripod adapter on the right barrel and not on the end of the hinge as is typical today.

There is a superb historical review of the Swift here on Bird forum:
http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=42944

Look to post 15.

They are truly a superb classic binocular.  Just their size and lack of waterproofing is about the only ding.

As to value, they can be wonky.  I'd say $150-200 tops, but you never know, I snagged a jewel for $20, so you never know.





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Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: May/31/2014 at 19:08
Yep....both binocs from both ebay sales have the tripod screw under the barrel.  Amazingly, both binoculars are about the exact same condition---almost perfect!

Maybe I should spring for one of them!  






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Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: June/09/2014 at 12:42
ED

Curious to know if you did you end up getting a Swift Audubon 8.5 x 44?

If yes let us know about it...


I bought one off ebay in April and have been very pleased with it!
Paid 68.00 + 12.75 shipping so not too terribly expensive.

- Wide FOV: 420ft @ 1000 yds
- clear optics; these BaK4 prism binoculars were neoprene gasket sealed to keep internal optics clean (weather resistant but not waterproof)     
- good control of CA, good sharp resolution, if just a little soft at the very edges. Impressive for their era - they were made in 1961


Pierre

-------------
All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: June/09/2014 at 18:41
No....I chickened out...and I believe the End Date of the auction was going to be while I was at work....

Those two went for something like $128 and $158 plus postage...

I just couldn't get serious about it after thinking about all the other things I need to do.  Whatever


-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: June/12/2014 at 20:21
Ed

If you are still interested, there is a Mark II Swift Audubon 8.5 x 44 bino on ebay right now

It's a "Buy it Now" - ebay item # 251539658974 - price is 130.11 + shipping
it's in Great Britain

Has orig leather case + all lens caps, looks to be in very good condition, better condition and newer model than the one I bought in April

closes on 23 June so you have time   

-------------
All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: June/13/2014 at 00:37
Here you go Ed.

http://betterviewdesired.com/Swift-8-5x44-Audubon.php - http://betterviewdesired.com/Swift-8-5x44-Audubon.php  Big Grin


-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: June/14/2014 at 17:39
Bucky

-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Pierre D.
Date Posted: July/17/2014 at 10:25
Ed

If you are still interested in a Swift Audubon

There is a 1965 Swift Audubon model 804 listed ebay right now as an
auction:
- current bid: 31.00
- listing ends on 20 July '14 at 7:32 AM (Pacific Time = 10:32 AM Eastern Time)
- eBay item number: 151356080989
- link:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/151356080989?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


Originally posted by Son of Ed Son of Ed wrote:

No....I chickened out...and I believe the End Date of the auction was going to be while I was at work....

Those two went for something like $128 and $158 plus postage...

I just couldn't get serious about it after thinking about all the other things I need to do.  Whatever


-------------
All the best,
Pierre
John 14:6


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: August/02/2014 at 12:08
That bino went for a lot of money at the end.  

-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: bratters
Date Posted: November/11/2014 at 06:29
Hi guys - I'm new to this forum which I found in my search for information. I'm very happy to meet a bunch of people who retain a love of old porros.

I could do with some help. I've collected for many years but stumbled on a pair of Japanese porros in a junk shop a few days ago. No case, no lens caps and looking very scruffy was a pair of Hitomi 8x30s, priced @ $10. 

I'd never heard of them but the right marks were visible, they didn't look abused and the interiors seemed clean enough so I bought 'em.

Fortunately all they wanted was a little external TLC. Moving parts were a bit tight but easily fixed and the insides were gleaming - clean as whistle & straight out of the factory. Not a trace of dust, fungus or lens film so no disassembly needed.

But the real good news was the vision - just stunning. 

I have a regular set of binocular test points ranging from a 20 foot distant bird table through a 10 mile distant TV mast and I compare results against a standard table of marks set by a pair of Zeiss 10x50. The Hitomi scored brilliantly in all respects. Bright and sharp as a pin, excellent focus and a joy to use. They even pick up the TV mast guy ropes and that is some result for an 8x30.

So these have me baffled. If they are so good - and believe me, they are -  how come nobody seems to have heard of Hitomi? Was there a name change? was it a test run? or have I just been plumb lucky?

The manufacturers marks are JB230 and JE6. 

Left plate - HITOMI   Coated Optics     plus a circle within  triangle design containing letters HOC.

Right plate - 8x30   Field 7.5   No. 65022

I would guess early '50s(?) with a standard finish for the type/period and no rubber eye reliefs

Any info really welcomed. Only hope I'm posting in the right place!

Thanks JB.












Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: November/16/2014 at 20:04
Post some pictures if you can please.  Show the relevant information you reference.  Additionally, and in particular, there should be one or two JL ###'s.  These will be either a J-B ### and a J-E ###.  They are usually located at the objective end of the central hinge, but sometimes appear elsewhere.

The list of Japanese manufacturers of that era ran into the hundreds.  They ranged from small mom and pop shops that made small numbers to remaining Japanese giants like Kamakura, Nikon and Kowa.  J-B indicates the maker of the binocular and the J-E indicates who made the housing.

There were several prominent types of Japanese design shared by many.  There were only one or two basic designs (from housing appearance anyway) in each objective size category.

I do not see the name Hitomi in any of the manufacturers on my list.  They may have been a seller of optics who had a company make binoculars for them, but I really don't know for sure.

It is not particularly unusual to come across a view that will amaze you, especially for 50 or so year old binoculars.  The Japanese got to the point where they had the porro figured out.


-------------
Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: November/16/2014 at 21:55
http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=12914 - http://www.opticstalk.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=12914  

-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/20/2014 at 10:17
Well I'm on my way to another collection.... Whacko
 
 
Now I've done it!!!!
 
You guys hooked me good!!!
 
Unfortunately I wear eyeglasses so the extreme Wide Angle models are out.
 
Given that what WA binos have SOME eye relief so the eyeglass wearer can use them?
 
I've already started canvasing eBay and my first buy is a:
 
Sears 7X50mm Binoculars Model 473.25130 delivered for $15.80 Shocked
 
It looks prestine!
 
next a rangemaster then a couple of Jena(s)....  i'm a glutton...


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: November/20/2014 at 12:34
Originally posted by budperm budperm wrote:

Unfortunately I wear eyeglasses so the extreme Wide Angle models are out.
 
Given that what WA binos have SOME eye relief so the eyeglass wearer can use them?
 


Bud,

On most vintage Porro prism binoculars you can either pull off the rubber eyecups or unscrew the 
plastic or metal eyecups.  This will give you additional eye relief for your eyeglasses.
Then all you have to do is glue some rubber O-rings around the metal eyepiece housings
to keep from scratching your eyeglasses.

I did this DIY project to the eyecups/eyepieces of my vintage Nikon 9x35 7.3* Porro prism binocular,
I also did the same thing to my vintage SPECTRUM I 20X65 Porro prism.   
It may not work with every vintage Porro prism eyepiece housing.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/DANCO-100-Piece-O-Ring-Kit-34443/100135126?N=5yc1vZc6a6 - http://www.homedepot.com/p/DANCO-100-Piece-O-Ring-Kit-34443/100135126?N=5yc1vZc6a6  

Hatco - 05.30.009B - Rubber Wash



-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/20/2014 at 15:36
check this out... one of the guy on another thread pulled this out of his hat...
 
 
 
Maybe this will help.
 
 
 
Japanese Manufacturer's Codes for Optical Products.

Most Japanese binoculars from the 1960s and several decades later carry one
or two tiny marks on the body, about 2 mm in height, frequently adjacent to
the hinge axis on the rear, between the objectives.  'JB' and two or three
digits identifies the manufacturer of the finished binocular, and 'JE'
identifies the maker of the body.  The J symbol has a small horizontal line
extending from the middle of the J, and is explained in a pamphlet from the
Japan Binoculars Export Promotion Association, _'63 Binoculars From Japan_. 
"Combining the letters L and J (standing for Light Machinery of
Japan)......on the shoulder hinges or support strut of all approved
binoculars manufactured in Japan since November 1959."  The JBEPA had their
US office in the Japan Trade Center, 393 Fifth Ave, NY.
This list was obtained by Bill Beacom, who arranged for its translation, and
converted to electronic form by Fred Schwartzman.  A second, later, list
added further companies; the earlier list used 'Kogaku' and the later list
used 'Optical'.  No dates are available for either list.
We are looking for the manufacturers represented by the missing numbers 65,
66, and 209.
=============
Checkup On Quality -  JAPANESE BINOCULAR INSPECTION INSTITUTE

Binoculars from Japan are rigidly inspected to make sure that every
component is of top quality and that all mechanisms are in perfect working
order. All optical products that have passed these rigorous standards are
tagged “PASSED” by the Government’s Japan Telescopes Inspection Institute.

The JL mark:  Only those binocular and optical manufacturers meeting Japan’s
Government standards of inspection and quality may use the authorized JL
symbol.  This symbol accompanied by the letter “E” or “B” and the number of
the respective manufacturer is engraved on the objective-end hinge or on the
cover plate. The letter “E” designating the metalwork manufacturer is
engraved on the right and the letter “B” designating the manufacturer of the
finished product is on the left.

“PASSED” labels.  This oval silver paper label marked “JTII” certifies that
binoculars have complied with the export standards of the Japan Telescopes
Inspection Institute. It is usually found on the axle of the binoculars.
-----
The quality of the JB marked products are rechecked by the Institute for
items that are exported. This rigorous Government system insures that only
top quality binoculars are exported from Japan. Know your dealer. Your final
check on a quality pair of binoculars is your faith and reliance in your
dealer. A reputable dealer will stand behind his optical products.
=====================
Below are two lists, one in numeric order and the second in alphabetic
order.

JB 1     Toa Kogaku Co.Ltd., Tokyo
JB 2     Katsuma Kogaku Kikai Co.Ltd.
JB 3     Toei Kogaku Seisakujo Co.Ltd.
JB 4     Toei Kogaku Co. Ltd., Hatogaya-Shi
JB 5     Meiji Seiko Co. Ltd.
JB 6     Asahi Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo.
JB 7     Nippon Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 8     Fuji Sbashin Koki Co. Ltd.
JB 9     Sato Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 10     Toko Seiki Co. Ltd.
JB 11     Omiya Kogaku Kikai Seisalcujo, Tokyo
JB 12     Orora Kogaku Co. Ltd. - Aurora Kogaku Co. Ltd.
JB 14     Ueta Seiki Co. Ltd.
JB 15     Tokyo Oputikaru Co. Ltd.- Tokyo Optical Co. Ltd.
JB 16     Sankei Koki Seisakujo Inc.
JB 17     Otake Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo
JB 18     Tokyo Kogaku Kikai Co. Ltd.
JB 19     FujiKogeisha Co. Ltd.
JB 20     Mitsui Koki Seisakujo Co. Ltd.
JB 21     Kokisha Co. Ltd., Tokyo
JB 22     Itabashi Kogaku Kikai Seisakujo Inc.,Tokyo
JB 23     Ishii Kogaku Co. Ltd.,Yokohama
JB 24     Ichikawa Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.,Tokyo
JB 25     Zuiho Kogaku Seiki Co. Ltd., Tokyo
JB 26     Futaba Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 27     Sanyo Koki Co. Ltd.
JB 28     Fuji Seinñtsukiki Seisakujo. Inc.
JB 29     Meikosha Inc.
JB 30     Kofu Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 31     Muraki Koko Co. Ltd.
JB 32     Miyako Seiki Co. Ltd.
JB 33     Teito Koki Co. Ltd.
JB 34     Musashi Kogaku Co. Ltd.
JB 35     Raito Koki Seisakujo Co. Ltd. - Lite Koki Seisakujo Co. Ltd.
JB 36     Jiyama Seiko Co.
JB 37     Yoshinon Kogaku Kikai Co. Ltd.
JB 38     Nakabishi Kogaku Inc.
JB 39     Josei Koki Inc.
JB 40     Mutsu Koki Inc.
JB 41     Shinsei Kogaku Seiki Co. Ltd.
JB 42     Nippon Garasu Kogyo Co. Ltd. Takinokawa Syuchojo
JB 43     Tozaki Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 44     likura Kogaku Seisakujo Inc.
JB 45     Taisei Kogaku Kogyo Co; Ltd.
JB 45     Tamron Co., Ltd., Tokyo
JB 46     Otsuka Kogaku Co. Ltd., Tokyo
JB 47     Tokuhiro Koki Seisakusho Inc., Tokyo
JB 48     Kazusa Koki Seisakujo Inc.
JB 49     Sankyo Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 50     Tanaka Koki Seisakujo. Inc.
JB 51     Yoshimoto Kogaku Co. Ltd.
JB 52     Kanto Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 53     Inoue Koki Seisakujo Inc.
JB 54     Suzuki Kogaku Seiki Co. Ltd.
JB 55     Enshu Kogaku Seiki Co. Ltd.,Tokyo.
JB 56     Hiyoshi Kogaku Co. Ltd.
JB 57     Oji Kogaku Kikai Co. Ltd.
JB 58     Ryuko Seisakujo
JB 59     Mitsui Kogaku Seisakujo
JB 60     Akebono Optical, Tokyo
JB 60     Wakaba Koki Seisakujo Inc.
JB 61     Meiho Kogaku Seisakujo Inc.
JB 62     Oshiro Kogaku Co. Ltd.
JB 63     Ofuna Kogaku Kogyo Co. Ltd.
JB 64     Kobayashi Kogaku Scisakitjo. Inc.
JB 65    
JB 66    
JB 67     Esaka Kogaku
JB 68     Sono Kogaku Kikai Co. Ltd.
JB 69     Akebono Kogaku Kogyo Co
JB 70     Sugamo Kogaku Seisakujo
JB 71     Toho Koki Co. Ltd., Tokyo
JB 72     Rubina Koki Co. Ltd.
JB 73     Tsuchida Kogaku Seisakujo.
JB 74     Omori Sogo Kogaku Kogyo
JB 75     Seki Kogaku Kikai Co. Ltd.
JB 76     Izumi Seiki Seisakujo. Inc.
JB 77     Koronbia Kogaku Co. Ltd.  – Columbia Kogaku Co.
JB 78     Kuribayashi Kogaku Seisakujo
JB 79     Furukawa Kogaku Seisakujo
JB 80 
 
 
 


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: November/20/2014 at 15:48
Bud,

I already posted that info in the above opticstalk link. Wink


Depending upon just how W I D E you are interested in going, here's some that I use with eyeglasses.

Nikon 7x35  9.3* Wide Angle Gold Sentinel Porro prism (made in Japan) (eBay)
Unlike the later Action Series the Gold Sentinel is sharp out to the edges.

Bushnell 7x35  9.5* WA Sportview Porro prism (Division of Bausch & Lomb Japan)
This one was really an inexpensive model during its day; I bought it because it was brand new, (eBay).
Mostly good for keeping in a vehicle year round just to have anything on hand.

Montgomery Ward 7x35 11.8* Ultra Wide Angle Porro prism (made in Japan) Salvation Army Thrift Store.
Eventually this one will go off to Cory Suddarth for an internal clean & lube + adjustments. 

All of these have the fold down rubber eyecups which work well with eyeglasses. Thunbs Up
Beware of vintage plastic or metal eyecups, which will not allow you to get as close to the eyepiece lenses with your eyeglasses.


-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: November/20/2014 at 18:25
That is widely downloaded from this site, one every Vintage porro fan should have bookmarked.  In my case I have the Japanese J-L page as a file on my desktop, my laptop, my tablet, and even my cellphone.  Never know when it will come in handy, and it comes in handy quite a bit.

http://www.europa.com/~telscope/binotele.htm

As to the query on the eye relief on the Bushnell Rangemaster, there is maybe 10 mm on the early Fuji model and a bit less than that on the last Tamron model.  The view is superb.


-------------
Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/22/2014 at 08:14
Man I'm digging a hole fast!  Looks like several will receive Vintage Porros for Xmas... Smile
 
Alright, first a couple of questions...
 
1)  Are my eyes fooling me or isn't the later Sears Discoverers actually Rangemaster gen 3s?
 
 
 
2)  Is there a short list of the more desired manufacturers? form the JTII list.
 
 
Man this is totally addicting!!!  I have to restrain myself or the only one getting Xmas from me is me...Loco.
 
I decided to buy a couple of the lower end models to start then I'd concentrate on cherry picking once I have a better idea of what I want an where I want to go...
 
So far.....
 
1.  Sears 7X50mm Model 473.25130  $15.80
 
2. Tasco 7X35mm Fully coated model 318  like new $17.50
 
3.  Sears 6266 Discoverer 7X35 mailto:578@1Kft - 578'@1Kft    $49.90
 
4. B&L Legacy EWA Field 11º  #12-7356     AF4872  $49.75
 
And I chickened out at the end and lost a Jena 8X30 in good condition that ended up selling for $86... Whacko
 
 
I'm thinking the B&L is the best find of the four followed by the Discoverer...
 
How do you guys think I did for starters?
 
 
 


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: 3_tens
Date Posted: November/22/2014 at 12:01
More glass than eyes.   Excellent   That's a lot better than having glass eyes.


-------------
Folks ain't got a sense of humor no more. They don't laugh they just get sore.

Need to follow the rules. Just hard to determine which set of rules to follow
Now the rules have changed again.


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: November/22/2014 at 12:50
Originally posted by budperm budperm wrote:

 
2)  Is there a short list of the more desired manufacturers? form the JTII list.
 

Tasco 7x35 Model 110  Porro 657' @ 1,000 yds.

Bushnell Rangemaster 7x35 Porro 10* made by Fujinon.

Bausch & Lomb 7x26 Custom   http://betterviewdesired.com/Bushnell-7x26-Custom.php - http://betterviewdesired.com/Bushnell-7x26-Custom.php




-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: Klamath
Date Posted: November/22/2014 at 22:29
I don't think the Sears Discoverer is quite the same as the Rangemaster.  At any rate they have different JB codes.  They are very good glass.

If you start buying a bunch of these, be prepared for some clunkers and some needed repairs.  What repair  ability I have gained is from necessity in doing some of the work myself.

My recommendations for top end vintage binoculars are, in no particular order...

Baush & Lomb Zephyr  Probably the last truly made in the USA binocular.  Outstanding view
Bushnell Rangemasters  Big and heavy for 7x35's but what a view'  Versions by Fuji and Tamron.
Swift Binoculars.  This is a brand that has been destroyed and is a pity.  Their Audubon series 8.5x44 are seriously good. So are the Sport King and Holiday.
Bushnell Custom are good
Jason Venture
Sears Discoverer, particularly some of the 11* EWA 7x50's

Just go slow, you'll pick up a lot along the way...binoculars and knowledge.  Have fun.  Be prepared for the odd clunker.  Ask me how I know Big Smile


-------------
Steve
"Everything that can be counted does not necessarily count; everything that counts cannot necessarily be counted". William Bruce Cameron



Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 08:25
Should be an interesting trip....  I used to clean and adjust the fiber optic inspection microscopes at my last job. B&L and AOs.   at 200 to 600 magnification it's hard to get the field clean and clear of debris. 
 
I've never opened up a bino but I'm well acquainted with optics cleaning procedures for microscopes.  I have the spanners needed to open / unscrew lenses too.  It's been a few years....Hippie


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 09:49



I just scarfed these up on ebay yesterday.  Sears 6243 Amber Coated 7 X 35s  with 578' FOV.    $26.56 plus postage.  Will be a Christmas gift to a son-in-law....Look to be hardly used....








-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 09:58


Here is another photo but these are not the ones I bought.  Mine do not have any numbers carved into them.....Eek











-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:06
I like old binoculars....but they're not waterproof.  So, after you buy a few for very reasonable prices, you should quit and go back to getting real, waterproof ones....


But, I have a Sears Discoverer 7 X 50  11*   needs a cleaning, but is still great

and a Manon 7 X 50  small degree FOV    mint

a Tasco 7 X 35 400 International  11*    578' FOV   mint

a Tasco 118   7 X 35  with 11*  mint condition but needs collimation (!)  Shocked    [ I paid $18 for them to my door...]

a Baigish ( Russian )  8 X 30  Brand New....   ( paid $41 to my door!! )  Bucky








-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:12
Thanks guys, I think I've successfully survived my plunge into it.
Now to be more prudent and selective.  I'm getting lost in all the research, I have to admit...Whacko


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:14
Tell me about it....I want them all!

-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:18
ED I was a royal CH from bidding on that 6243 but everybody is saying its problematic for eyeglass wearers on all the EWAs...
 
Got it cheap! Excellent


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:19
Did you see the Monkey Wards One with 609'@ 1K?!?!?

-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: budperm
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 10:57
Help again guys!  There is a
 Fujinon Poseidon MTR-SX 7x50 Bino on eBay
and I've heard the Fijinon name more than once associated with hi-end Binos.
 
Are these decent glass?  They have EP of 7.1mm and 12mm ER I need and mailto:~400@1K - ~400'@1K
They are listed for ~$50 with a few hours left.  If good ones, what price point limit? ?$150?


-------------
"Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading".
--Thomas Jefferson





Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 12:32
I've got all Monkey Wards and Jason super wides on my Watch List as we speak.....


I will have one or two of them soon.....I will certainly win one or two of them...


-------------
Visit the Ed Show


Posted By: Bird Watcher
Date Posted: November/23/2014 at 13:43
Originally posted by budperm budperm wrote:

Help again guys!  There is a
 Fujinon Poseidon MTR-SX 7x50 Bino on eBay
and I've heard the Fijinon name more than once associated with hi-end Binos.
 
Are these decent glass?  They have EP of 7.1mm and 12mm ER I need and mailto:~400@1K - ~400'@1K
They are listed for ~$50 with a few hours left.  If good ones, what price point limit? ?$150?

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/binoculars/mt/#mt_7x50mtrsx - http://www.fujifilm.com/products/binoculars/mt/#mt_7x50mtrsx

Bidding varies on eBay every time a different seller advertises.

Retail price on the internet is just under $500.00 for a Fujinon 7x50 MTR-SX.

The Fujinon 7x50 that you are referring to is in reality a Fujinon FMTR-SX which has field flattners
in the eyepieces & is more expensive than the MTR-SX. 
You can tell by the yellow rings around the eyepieces & the yellow paint behind the tripod adapter
socket cap.


-------------
I prefer Porro prism binoculars especially those made in Japan. (i.e. Minox BD 10x44 BP) 8>)


Posted By: Son of Ed
Date Posted: December/04/2014 at 10:39

I just got a pair of Montgomery Wards 7X35s delivered to the door.  They have 11.8* 620 Feet FOV.  These are like freaking Brand New!  Very nice for $34 plus ship.  

I also got a Jason Statesman 11.5* bino a couple of weeks ago.  It's clean and sharp...but not as snazzy as these Wards ones.  I only paid $17 I think for those Jasons....



 


-------------
Visit the Ed Show



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