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Sako rifles

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/19/2008 at 04:54
heikkiv View Drop Down
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Joined: September/19/2008
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Of course when trying to find out the optimal accuracy handloading gives the best results, but don't fool yourself with only 5-shot lucky groups. Especially when hunting with the rifle it is essential what your rifle _really_ can do. Finding out this most experts recommend shooting minimum 20-round groups including the "grease shot" (don't know what it is in english, but means the first shot with cleaned bore. The one that usually is apart from the rest of the group:)

Naturally one cannot say that every rifle or every barrel is bad, but unfortunately lots of previously good manufacturers have cut costs in their manufacturing process causing the situation where getting that really really good rifle depends more on the luck than the price in the mid-price category.

remington was my other choice when I choose the rifle, but nobody had yet imported them to finland so I didn't have any user experiences regarding it. Also here in Finland most gunsmiths know sako/tikka actions like their own pockets so in case of failure there's always help.

http://bugi.oulu.fi/~heikkiv/pix/weaponry/tarket.JPG

There's couple of handloading tests compared to norma and lapua factory ammo @ 150 meters. Not so great results, but I've only shot around 70 shots with the barrel and those were my first handloads, so I'm hoping that eventually I'll get to the desired ½MOA with it. Caliber is 6.5x55SE by the way.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/19/2008 at 06:42
8shots View Drop Down
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We call the "grease shot" the fouling shot.
Yes buying an accurate rifle can sometimes be a hit and miss affair if it is mass produced. I will be trying out the same load this weekend and see if I can get consistent results.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/21/2008 at 00:55
timber View Drop Down
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My Sako 85 Hunter has the best trigger of my current 6-7 rifle inventory but only has fair accuracy.  I like it for it's ultra smooth action and quality feel.  You should be aware that it won't cock as easily as your Model 70.  Try to dry fire it in the store and then lift the bolt.  Some of my hunting buddies were turned off of Sako's because of this.  I've just learned to 'hit' the bolt handle and don't even think about it. 

Some folks like me complain about the hard recoil pad and replace it as I did with a Kick-Eez or Pachmayr.  In general I find the Sako to be an altogether different rifle than my 700's and Model 70.  BTW, the laminated stainless is a strikingly sharp looking rifle but I'm partial to walnut.  This is a convenient excuse to post my Sako again.






Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/21/2008 at 06:41
Ed Connelly View Drop Down
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Boy, timber, that is a nice looking rifle!  You can "polish" the cocking piece on the back end of your bolt with some plumber's goopy stuff ( kinda like lapping your lugs ) which will reduce the hard bolt lift....somewhat.
 
I had two Sakos over the years--one was a L61R from 1978 or so ( I bought it in '78--it might have been on the shelf for a couple of years--who knows? ) and I had an AV model from the mid-eighties....that one had a recoil pad that would stop a bullet!!  They were both super accurate....the older one was heavy, the AV Hunter somewhat lighter than the other. I sure liked 'em......past tense.......they're gone now.......Sad
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/21/2008 at 12:11
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
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sako stocks, (design) have always ahead of the times, get a mcmillian sako stock and have the best of both-- never had a remmy (10 or 15 lost count) that wouldn't shoot under an inch out of the box. having a lot of aftermarket options, stocks, triggers, barrels, is an indication of how great the gun is== not a reflection of its deficiencies. numbers of shots fired for group size is almost irrelevant  if half the groups are not shot prone or sitting etc, especially in a hunting rifle.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/21/2008 at 19:06
timber View Drop Down
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Ed, thanks for the tip.  The lugs look and feel very smooth.  I've cautiously used a very little Shooter's Choice Grease on the lugs to no avail.  It's not recommended by Sako, only an oily rag.

Dale, I don't care for the Sako 85 stock shape.  It's too skinny in the buttstock, IMO.  But they've changed the recoil lug design and that limits the choices of after-market choices.  The lug's design is interesting but it better fit perfectly in the stock or there's going to be a problem.  I wish they'd have stuck to a traditional lug.  Check this out:

http://www.gunsandhunting.com/Dethroned.html
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/22/2008 at 08:57
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
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ok get a mcmillian remington stock configuration fitted for the sako action.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/22/2008 at 17:01
RifleDude View Drop Down
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Originally posted by timber timber wrote:

You should be aware that it won't cock as easily as your Model 70.  Try to dry fire it in the store and then lift the bolt.  Some of my hunting buddies were turned off of Sako's because of this.  I've just learned to 'hit' the bolt handle and don't even think about it. 
 
Hard bolt lift on cocking is common with all 3-lug actions, and for that matter, all short bolt lift actions to some degree.  The reason for this is the extremely steep cocking cam.  The bolt has to compress the firing pin spring the same amount as a 90-deg bolt lift action with a shorter cocking stroke.  This is just one of the tradeoffs with a 54 - 70 degree bolt lift action.


Edited by RifleDude - September/22/2008 at 17:02
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/22/2008 at 22:24
timber View Drop Down
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Dale, here's a couple of pictures I copied from the article:
http://www.gunsandhunting.com/Dethroned.html

Here's the Sako receiver - the 85 is on the left and the 75 on the right.



Here's the Sako stocks - 85 left and 75 right.



In the first picture the 85's recoil lug is that small rectangular 'nub' (with the bolt hole) a fraction of an inch in height.  That 'nub' fits into the plate (the rectangular slot with bolt hole) shown in the second picture and is held in place by the front action bolt/screw.  The plate is held to the stock by two wood screws.

The engineering principle (as explained to me by a very knowledgeable Beretta Customer Service representative) is that the receiver and plate become one when the 'nub' is secured in that slot but it is critical that they mate perfectly in the same plane. 

At first glance it's an elegant solution but the more I studied it the less I liked it.  I think it could potentially be difficult to have a custom stock made to accommodate that plate  in the exact correct location.  Maybe I'm wrong.


Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/23/2008 at 00:02
snowflake77 View Drop Down
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anyone have any experience with the Sako A7? Looking to add a piece to the collection and would like your feedback. Thanks
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/23/2008 at 00:32
Dale Clifford View Drop Down
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mcmillians fit more difficult problems than this, contact them I'll bet they already have the answer.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: September/23/2008 at 18:38
timber View Drop Down
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Thanks.
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