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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 05:57
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 06:21
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I never put ice in Scotch. Not even the stainless steel cubes. I reserve ice for mixers, but never with Scotch. I do add a splash of water to a dram. It does help unlock flavors. For high ABV and cask strength Scotches, I add a bit larger splash, in stuff below 46% and in less assertive Scotches, just a few drops. Sometimes it does improve the nose and taste experience, sometimes not, but it never hurts.

As far as extra matured Scotch is concerned, 18 years is generally the cutoff point where I’m still willing to pay for it, with notable exceptions like Macallan 18, which has become too expensive in comparison to other quality 18s. I’m just not willing to spend upwards of $200 a bottle, no matter how good it is. The oldest age statement Scotch I did buy and still have some onhand is Old Pulteney 21. I think it’s fantastic whisky! It was at the upper limit, maybe even a bit beyond the upper limit of what I’m typically willing to spend, but I felt like splurging at the time.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:25
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Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  

We've debated this often amongst some of my poker buddies at games..... I normally offer up some apple pie moonshine as its very mild however it will slip up on you if you sip to fast, but want to know what you'd take to a gathering where a few folks want to try stuff but you don't' want to give them a bad experience.

Beer is normally not allowed during games.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:40
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Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:



Glenmorangie 18 is probably my favorite of all, but the Macallan 18 gives it a hard run. 

Let me recommend to you... when tasting a fine whisky, NEVER put ice in it.  It you want it chilled, refrigerate the bottle in a wine refrigerator.  Pour your whisky in a clean dry glass and add just a SPLASH of water (which will open up the flavors).  Then enjoy.  As ice melts, it dilutes the whisky and you lose the intricate, some almost hidden, flavors.  You will never get the full "taste" with ice.



+1 on the Macallan 18

Going to have to try the splash of water technique. Thunbs Up
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 09:55
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Originally posted by Scrumbag Scrumbag wrote:

...and for personal preference 50/50 with your scotch.

Oh wow, that's a lot of water! I never add more than a few drops, maybe a half teaspoon at the most, especially if it's a light, delicate single malt. The most I'll ever add to a dram is around a teaspoon or so to really bold flavored Scotch like Aberlour A'bunadh cask strength. I don't want to dilute the flavors, just use enough water to open up the flavors.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 10:01
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Originally posted by SVT_Tactical SVT_Tactical wrote:

Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  


One very mild-mannered Scotch that I'd recommend as a good "intro" for people who have never tried Scotch before is Glenmorangie Original 10 year old. As a bonus, it's also very reasonably priced, yet is excellent for the price.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/02/2018 at 10:48
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Glenmorangie is a very good "introductory" Scotch.  Also, Glenrothes is surprisingly decent.  Another one that is not very common, but is, IMO, the best of the mild scotches is Cardhu.

Generally, for anyone who likes Speyside scotches, if you havn't tried Cardhu, you are missing out.

ILya
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/03/2018 at 04:43
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Originally posted by SVT_Tactical SVT_Tactical wrote:

Love asking this from others - for a newb.... I.e. someone who hardly drinks liquors or any type......

What would be a recommended whiskey/scotch/ sipping drink that would not be to harsh?  

We've debated this often amongst some of my poker buddies at games..... I normally offer up some apple pie moonshine as its very mild however it will slip up on you if you sip to fast, but want to know what you'd take to a gathering where a few folks want to try stuff but you don't' want to give them a bad experience.

Beer is normally not allowed during games.

For a blended whisky, Famous Grouse is very, very hard to beat... especially at the price.

For a single malt Glenmorangie Lasanta... 12 year old aged in sherry casks.  It is the "newest" of the sherry cask aged Glenmorangie.  Is a bit higher alcohol content, but still VERY smooth and reasonably priced.  I still have some of the "old" stuff, but the Lasanta is excellent.

Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/03/2018 at 11:47
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Trying all these Scotches sounds like trying all the Bourbons; if you did it, there wouldn't be time to be sober, and you couldn't remember which one you liked best.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/03/2018 at 12:05
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I think Glenmorangie as a whole brand is usually a good choice for "introductory" single malts. I say usually, because they keep coming up with so many designer variations on the same basic signature style with fancy-sounding sub-names that it's hard to keep up with them all. Their signature style is a more mellow, approachable flavored single malt than most. I recommended their 10 year old Original version as an intro Scotch as much because it is inexpensive as its mellow, non-harsh flavor profile. That way, if one doesn't like it, they aren't out much money, and if they do like it, it's a good intro to Glenmo's more expensive offerings.

For clarification on Lasanta, it is only "finished" in sherry casks for the last 2 years of its maturation, not entirely matured in sherry casks. The first 10 years, it's aged in ex-bourbon casks, the same as all Glenmorangie whiskies. I agree it's excellent, and also agree that it would be a good choice for someone interested in trying a single malt for the first time. I think the same can be said for their other two 12-year old single malts, Nectar D'Or and Quinta Ruban. These 4 make up Glenmo's so-called "core" group of whiskies, which is to say the 4 most commonly found in stores, and the 4 that are at least somewhat inexpensive (by single malt Scotch standards, that is). Lasanta, Nectar, and Quinta all start out as their same 10-year old Original, that then are "finish" matured for an extra 2 more years in different types of casks. Lasanta is finished in ex-sherry casks, Nectar D'Or is finished in ex-Sauternes wine casks, and Quinta Ruban is finished in ex-port wine casks. All 3 are outstanding IMO, only different. Of those 3, I like Nectar D'Or the best personally, followed by Quinta Ruban and Lasanta.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/03/2018 at 12:29
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On the subject of Glenmorangie, it is one of my favorite distilleries overall. If you want variety, Glenmo has it. They have something to offer in all price ranges and tastes it seems. It's tough to keep up with all their variants. 

I've liked everything I've tried so far from Glenmo, but I am annoyed by their tendency to come up with so many "no age statement" whiskies of late. This isn't unique to Glenmo, however; it seems most distilleries are increasingly omitting age statements. NAS Scotch in general kinda pisses me off. I think too often it's an example of marketing over substance. Badge whisky with less time (and with it, cost) involved in its production with pretentious-sounding marketing and fancy packaging, and sell it for more money. With the explosion of NAS whiskies, some of these distilleries seemingly put more effort into marketing hype and packaging artwork than into the actual whisky residing in the bottle. Age statements give the customer a better idea of the relative quality and care that went into its production. I believe the distilleries should be more transparent with the consumer on what they are buying, and single malt Scotch has always carried the reputation as a more premium product. 
 
Age statement or NAS, ultimately the proof of quality is in the tasting, and extra long maturation is no guarantee that any given whisky will be "better" than some other younger whisky. Your own taste buds provide the final verdict. But at least putting an age statement on the label gives the buyer a better idea of what they are getting for money spent as compared to a younger age whisky from the same distillery. 
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 17:42
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I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 17:45
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Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.


Try Blantons πŸ‘πŸ₯ƒ..   

No Sprite πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚!
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 18:25
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I once SAW a bottle of Red Breast!!!   Big Grin
Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 19:22
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 19:33
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Originally posted by sucker76 sucker76 wrote:

I am very new to the whisky game. My first experience with scotch was sneaking a sip from dad's glass when I was maybe 9. It was horrible! I haven't liked it since. I started drinking bourbons and liked them a lot more. Well I didn't want a old memory of too young taste buds to tarnish a good scotch so I recently tried it again. I tried Johnny Walker Red Label. I couldn't overcome the sharp taste of the scotch. Is the red label a decent scotch or not? Will the Glemorangie be better for a newcomer?

On to the bourbons. I haven't had a whole lot or variety. I do like Makers Mark for sipping. Jack Daniels mixed with Sprite is surprisingly refreshing.

The thing about Scotch is, there's such a huge variation in styles and flavor profiles that one brand and variation of Scotch can taste completely different from another made in a different distillery in a different region of Scotland...so much so that one might think they're from entirely different classification of spirits. So, whenever I hear someone say that they tried Scotch once and hated it but like other types of whiskies, I can't help but believe they simply tried one of a style that doesn't suit their taste. Or, they tried a cheap blend. Not all Scotch is created close to equal. The thing that makes Scotch "Scotch" is that is whisky distilled in Scotland out of malted barley then aged in oak barrels for no less than 3 years. Apart from that, there can be many differences in distillation and aging techniques that have a profoundly different effect on the end result. Some Scotch whiskies can be very smoky and therefore can taste harsh and bitter to someone trying it for the first time. Others have no smokiness whatsoever.

Even when taking account the differences in flavors between distilleries, on top that, there are 2 main classifications of Scotch whisky -- single malt Scotch and blended Scotch. Single malt Scotch is whisky made at a single distillery, and blended Scotch, as its name implies, is a blend of single malts from multiple distilleries. The Johnny Walker Red you tried is a blend, and is considered their "low end" blend. I haven't tried JW Red, so I can't identify its taste to compare to something else. I only have single malts in my booze cabinet and haven't had a blend in a long time. All those I mentioned in my OP are single malts.

Bourbon has many things in common with Scotch in its production, except instead of being distilled from malted barley, it's distilled from at least 51% corn (though may also contain rye or other grains in its mash bill, provided corn comprises at least 51%). Corn mash generally makes Bourbon a bit sweeter than Scotch on average.

If you like bourbon, I think Balvenie Doublewood 12 has close to a Bourbon flavor to my tastebuds. Glenmorangie Original 10 is not far off, as it is matured in ex-Bourbon barrels. Neither are quite as sweet as Bourbon. Both are good "introductory" Scotches to try. Another good intro single malt Scotch to try is Dalwhinnie 15. It doesn't taste anywhere close to Bourbon, but it is light and mellow, and has a honey-like sweetness to it.


Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/05/2018 at 20:02
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Thanks I'll give them a try. I know I haven't had enough variety to say I don't like scotch. I just know I didn't like the ones I've tried. I'm always open to try most anything.
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Another thing to consider is the "younger" whiskies are generally harsher than older aged whiskies. Longer maturation in the oak barrel imparts more complex flavors and tends to round off the hard edges. On the negative side, longer maturation period also increases the price, sometimes considerably.
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Originally posted by RifleDude RifleDude wrote:

I think Glenmorangie as a whole brand is usually a good choice for "introductory" single malts. I say usually, because they keep coming up with so many designer variations on the same basic signature style with fancy-sounding sub-names that it's hard to keep up with them all. Their signature style is a more mellow, approachable flavored single malt than most. I recommended their 10 year old Original version as an intro Scotch as much because it is inexpensive as its mellow, non-harsh flavor profile. That way, if one doesn't like it, they aren't out much money, and if they do like it, it's a good intro to Glenmo's more expensive offerings.

For clarification on Lasanta, it is only "finished" in sherry casks for the last 2 years of its maturation, not entirely matured in sherry casks. The first 10 years, it's aged in ex-bourbon casks, the same as all Glenmorangie whiskies. I agree it's excellent, and also agree that it would be a good choice for someone interested in trying a single malt for the first time. I think the same can be said for their other two 12-year old single malts, Nectar D'Or and Quinta Ruban. These 4 make up Glenmo's so-called "core" group of whiskies, which is to say the 4 most commonly found in stores, and the 4 that are at least somewhat inexpensive (by single malt Scotch standards, that is). Lasanta, Nectar, and Quinta all start out as their same 10-year old Original, that then are "finish" matured for an extra 2 more years in different types of casks. Lasanta is finished in ex-sherry casks, Nectar D'Or is finished in ex-Sauternes wine casks, and Quinta Ruban is finished in ex-port wine casks. All 3 are outstanding IMO, only different. Of those 3, I like Nectar D'Or the best personally, followed by Quinta Ruban and Lasanta.

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.

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Originally posted by Kickboxer Kickboxer wrote:

For clarification on Lasanta, verbally, finishing and aging are the same thing... merely implies the movement of the product from one cask type to another... for extra "aging".  Sometimes called "maturing"...  merely taking on qualities imparted by the sherry to the wood of the cask. In most cases, it mellows the taste, adds new flavors the oak-bourbon casks are not capable of. 

I prefer the Lasanta of those mentioned, but overall, I prefer the original Glenmoranie Finished in Sherry Casks:

"A Glenmorangie finished in Sherry Casks that demonstrates clearly the effects finishing can have on a whisky. The distillery character is there but you can definitely taste the Oloroso. This is aged for a total of 12 years despite there being no age statement on the bottle."

At 19, in the US, one is considered "too young" to drink.  At 21 they are considered to have matured enough to drink.  In the whole process, they have still aged.


I'm not confused by the terms and didn't contradict any of that, Dan. I said it wasn't entirely matured in sherry, as your original statement about it would seem to imply. Of course finishing is aging, though the word "finishing," as per the meaning of the word, is a term used by the industry to mean a shorter duration of time in a specific cask type distinctly different from the original cask used for the majority of the aging, done at the end of the maturation period. I was merely pointing out that only 2 years of its 12 years of aging was spent in sherry casks; the remaining 10 in bourbon casks, that's all. This is important because it has a distinctly different taste than a whisky that has spent its entire maturation period in a sherry cask, as it still retains the characteristic vanilla notes that the bourbon casks impart to Glenmo Original.

The original Sherry Wood Finish Glenmo was discontinued and replaced by Lasanta sometime around 10 years ago as part of a rebranding campaign. Though some variation in taste over time isn't uncommon with most distilleries, Lasanta is supposedly the same thing as the old Glenmo Sherry Wood Finish, except with a different looking label, new sub-name, and an age statement added.
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I haven't tried Aberlour 16 Double Cask, but have tried their 12 and have some of their 18 at the house. Given I really like 12, and I love 18 and A'bunadh, I have no doubt I'd like the 16 too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)     Back to Top Direct Link To This Post Posted: February/06/2018 at 19:06
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This is not going to be terribly popular, but while I generally like Glenmorangie whiskys, their Sherry finished stuff is just not great.

Try sherry finished Kilchoman and you will understand.  Ted, do you want me to bring you one when I come visit? (yes, folks, there are certain whisky benefits to being friendly with the Dark Lord...)

ILya

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Originally posted by tahqua tahqua wrote:

We aren't sure what Speyside we will have when we put my friends Gordon Setters ashes out in front of my beach on Gitchie Gumee. We are looking for the distillery closest to Gordon Castle.
One thing for sure, there will be Ugly Dog Vodka for Sadie's ashes at the same time.



πŸ‘πŸ₯ƒπŸΆ. I’ve done it a number of times my friend.
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Originally posted by koshkin koshkin wrote:

Try sherry finished Kilchoman and you will understand.  Ted, do you want me to bring you one when I come visit? (yes, folks, there are certain whisky benefits to being friendly with the Dark Lord...)

ILya


Yes sir! Thanks in advance!

Did you expect me to say something different? Ha!
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